Displaying 81 - 90 of 4268
  • Tuesday, Jun. 23, 2020
In this Sept. 25, 2018, file photo, Bill Cosby arrives for a sentencing hearing following his sexual assault conviction at the Montgomery County Courthouse in Norristown Pa. Cosby has won the right to fight his 2018 sexual assault conviction before the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. The 82-year-old Cosby has been imprisoned in suburban Philadelphia for nearly two years after a jury convicted him of drugging and sexually assaulting a woman in 2004. He’s serving a three- to 10-year sentence. The Supreme Court has agreed to review two aspects of the case that Cosby’s lawyers challenge. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
PHILADELPHIA (AP) -- 

In a stunning decision that could test the legal framework of #MeToo cases, Pennsylvania's highest court will review the trial decision to let five other accusers testify at Bill Cosby's sexual assault trial in 2018, which ended with his conviction. 

Cosby, 82, has been imprisoned in suburban Philadelphia for nearly two years after a jury convicted him of drugging and sexually assaulting a woman at his home in 2004. He's serving a three- to 10-year sentence.

The Supreme Court has agreed to review two aspects of the case, including the judge's decision to let prosecutors call the other accusers to testify about long-ago encounters with the once-powerful actor and comedian. Cosby's lawyers have long complained the testimony is remote and unreliable. 

The court will also consider, as it weighs the scope of the testimony allowed, whether the jury should have heard evidence that Cosby had given quaaludes to women in the past.

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  • Monday, Jun. 22, 2020
In this Jan.. 6, 2009, file photo, Golden Globe statuettes are seen during a news conference at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, Calif. The Hollywood Foreign Press Association says the ceremony will be held Feb. 28, 2021. (AP Photo/Matt Sayles, File)
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- 

The Golden Globes is refusing to let the pandemic get in the way of its party. 

The ceremony will be held Feb. 28, 2021, in Beverly Hills with previously announced hosts Tina Fey and Amy Poehler, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association said Monday.

The date, as with that of other awards, had been delayed amid the coronavirus disruption. But with the Academy Awards having staked out April 25 last week, the Globes jumped on the February date the Oscars had previously held.

The Golden Globes, set in a hotel ballroom that's arranged more like an oversized dinner party with drinks than a formal ceremony, positions itself as the freewheeling start to awards season. Exactly which movies and TV shows will be eligible for honors remains to be seen, given the virus-caused delay in production and movie theater screenings that's only now easing. 

Organizers said they will provide guidance on eligibility, the voting period and the timing More

  • Sunday, Jun. 21, 2020
In this Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2019, file photo, D.L. Hughley speaks during TV One's "Uncensored" and "The D.L. Hughley Show" panel during the Winter Television Critics Association Press Tour in Pasadena, Calif. Hughley has announced he's tested positive for COVID-19, following his collapse onstage during a performance in Nashville, Tenn., on Friday, June 19, 2020. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) -- 

Comedian D.L. Hughley announced he tested positive for COVID-19 after collapsing onstage during a performance in Nashville, Tennessee. 

The stand-up comedian, 57, lost consciousness while performing at the Zanies comedy nightclub on Friday night and was hospitalized, news outlets reported. On Saturday, Hughley posted a video on Twitter in which he said he was treated for exhaustion and dehydration afterward.

"I also tested positive for COVID-19, which blew me away," he says in the video. "I was what they call asymptomatic. I didn't have any symptoms, the classic symptoms."

Hughley plans to quarantine in his Nashville hotel room for 14 days. The remaining two nights of his four-night engagement at Zanies were canceled, according to the club's online calendar.

"Our friend D.L. Hughley had a medical emergency while performing on Friday and was hospitalized overnight. According to his publicist, he was suffering from exhaustion More

  • Friday, Jun. 19, 2020
Dave Franco, director/co-writer of "The Rental," poses at an advance screening of the film at Vineland Drive-In, Thursday, June 18, 2020, in City of Industry, Calif. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello)
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- 

Dave Franco says the drive-in premiere for his directorial debut was "perfect" but admittedly "a little weird."

The 35-year-old actor found himself at the center of Hollywood's evolving response to the coronavirus pandemic Thursday as he premiered his directorial debut "The Rental" to more than 1,300 people at the Vineland drive-in theatre in Southern California. 

Joined by stars including wife Alison Brie, Dan Stevens and Sheila Vand, he took off his mask to pose for photographers in the center of a massive parking lot, then answered questions via Zoom from his car after the film ended.

It beat a traditional, more buttoned-up red carpet event, Franco said.

"It didn't feel like there was a spotlight on me or the cast. It felt more like this communal experience where everyone was just excited to get out of their homes and, you know, let loose with a group of fellow movie lovers. It was perfect," he said in an interview Friday More

  • Friday, Jun. 19, 2020
In this file photo dated Nov. 18, 2019, Google employees walks out of Google France building in Paris. France. France’s highest administrative court on Friday June 19, 2020, has upheld a fine of 50 million euros (dollars 56 million US) against Google for not being “sufficiently clear and transparent” with users of Android about their data protection options. (AP Photo/Michel Euler, File)
PARIS (AP) -- 

France's highest administrative court has upheld a fine of 50 million euros ($56 million) Google was ordered to pay for not being "sufficiently clear and transparent" with Android users about their data protection options.

Google was first slapped with the fine in January 2019, the first penalty for a U.S. tech giant under new European data privacy rules that took effect in 2018. 

Google appealed the penalty issued by the French data privacy watchdog to the Council of State, France's final arbiter in such cases. 

The council ruled Friday that the National Data Protection Commission had the right to sanction Google and that the fine was not disproportionate, "given the particular seriousness" and duration of Google's failings.

In response, Google said it would look at making changes.

In force since May 2018, the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation, or GDPR, is aimed at clarifying individual rights to More

  • Friday, Jun. 19, 2020
In this Dec. 12, 2012 file photo, actor Ian Holm appears at the premiere of "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" in London. Holm, the acclaimed British actor whose long career included roles in “Chariots of Fire” and “The Lord of the Rings” has died, his agent said Friday. He was 88. Holm died peacefully in the hospital, surrounded by his family and carer, his agent, Alex Irwin, said in a statement. His illness was Parkinson’s related. (Photo by Jon Furniss/Invision/AP, File)
LONDON (AP) -- 

Ian Holm, a versatile British actor whose long career included roles in "Chariots of Fire" and "The Lord of the Rings" has died. He was 88.

Holm died peacefully Friday morning in a hospital, surrounded by his family and carer, his agent Alex Irwin said in a statement. His illness was Parkinson's-related.

"His sparkling wit always accompanied a mischievous twinkle in his eye," Irwin said. "Charming, kind and ferociously talented, we will miss him hugely.''

Holm appeared in scores of movies big and small, from costume dramas to fantasy epics. A generation of moviegoers knows him as Bilbo Baggins in "The Lord of the Rings" and "The Hobbit" trilogies.

He won a British Academy Film Award and gained a supporting-actor Oscar nomination for portraying pioneering athletics coach Sam Mussabini in the hit 1982 film "Chariots of Fire."

His other movie roles included Father Cornelius in "The Fifth Element," android Ash in "Alien More

  • Thursday, Jun. 18, 2020
In this Nov. 20, 2007 file photo, bottles of Mrs. Butterworth's syrup are displayed on a supermarket shelf in Basking Ridge, N.J. Mrs. Butterworth and Cream of Wheat are the latest brands reckoning with racially charged logos. Chicago-based Conagra Brands, which makes Mrs. Butterworth’s syrup, said its female-shaped bottles are intended to evoke a “loving grandmother.” But the company said it can understand that the packaging could be misinterpreted. The soul-searching comes in the wake of PepsiCo's announcement Wednesday, June 17, 2020, that it's renaming its Aunt Jemima syrup brand. (AP Photo/Mike Derer, File)

Colgate, Cream of Wheat and Mrs. Butterworth are the latest brands reckoning with racially charged logos.

The soul-searching comes in the wake of PepsiCo's announcement Wednesday that it's renaming its Aunt Jemima syrup brand. Mars Inc. says it's also reviewing its Uncle Ben's rice brand.

New York-based Colgate-Palmolive Co. said Thursday it is working with its Chinese partner, Hawley & Hazel Chemical Co., on changes to its Darlie brand toothpaste.

The toothpaste, which is popular in Asia, was called Darkie when it was first introduced in the 1930s. Packages featured a drawing of a minstrel singer in blackface with a wide smile; a Hawey & Hazel executive came up with the logo after visiting the United States and seeing Al Jolson perform. The Chinese name on the box translated to "black man toothpaste."

Colgate-Palmolive acquired a 50% stake in Hawley in 1985. In 1989, the name of the toothpaste was changed to Darlie More

  • Thursday, Jun. 18, 2020
In this Feb. 10, 2019 file photo, Peter Jackson poses for photographers at the BAFTA awards in London. Jackson's company, Weta Digital, one of the world’s premier visual effects companies, will begin producing original content. (Photo by Joel C Ryan/Invision/AP, File)

Weta Digital, the Academy Award-winning visual effects company that made "The Lord of the Rings" and "Avatar" possible, is making original animated content for cinemas and streaming for the first time in its 25-year history. The company also said Thursday that Prem Akkaraju had joined the New Zealand-based shop as CEO. 

Peter Jackson and Fran Walsh, the married filmmaking team behind "The Lord of the Rings" and majority stakeholders in the company, plan to write, produce and direct several of the projects for Weta Animated. 

"We are huge fans of animated storytelling in all of its forms, but it can be a long, protracted, and often costly way to make movies," Jackson said in a written statement. "That's, in part, why we have created this company — to change the model and open the doors to filmmakers and storytellers who might not otherwise be given the chance to show what they can do."

Weta Digital was founded in 1993 to produce the More

  • Thursday, Jun. 18, 2020
In this Feb. 28, 2017, file photo, Netflix Founder and CEO Reed Hastings smiles during an interview in Barcelona, Spain. Hastings and his wife, Patty Quillin, are donating $120 million toward student scholarships at historically black colleges and universities. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez, File)
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- 

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings and his wife, Patty Quillin, are donating $120 million toward student scholarships at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). 

The couple is giving $40 million to each of three institutions: the United Negro College Fund, Spelman College and Morehouse College. The organizations said it is the largest individual gift in support of student scholarships at HBCUs. 

Hastings has a history of supporting educational causes, including charter schools. He launched a $100 million education fund in 2016, beginning with money toward college scholarships for black and Latino students. 

Hastings said now is the time when "everyone needs to figure out" how to contribute to solving racism. He said HBCUs have been resilient "little-known gems" for black education.

Amid protests over police brutality that began three weeks ago, companies and business leaders have been pledging solidarity with their black More

  • Wednesday, Jun. 17, 2020
A bottle of Aunt Jemima syrup sits on a counter, Wednesday, June 17, 2020 in White Plains, N.Y. Pepsico is changing the name and marketing image of its Aunt Jemima pancake mix and syrup, according to media reports. A spokeswoman for Pepsico-owned Quaker Oats Company told AdWeek that it recognized Aunt Jemima’s origins are based on a racial stereotype and that the 131-year-old name and image would be replaced on products and advertising by the fourth quarter of 2020. (AP Photo/Donald King)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

America's painful struggles over racism have finally caught up with Aunt Jemima, that ubiquitous fixture served up at breakfast tables for 131 years.

Quaker Oats announced Wednesday that it will retire the Aunt Jemima brand, saying the company recognizes the character's origins are "based on a racial stereotype." Indeed, the logo was inspired by 19th century minstrel celebrating the "mammy," a black woman content to serve her white masters. A former slave, Nancy Green, became the first face of the pancake product in 1890.

Aunt Jemima's downfall is the latest signal of the powerful cultural moment unleashed by the Black Lives Matter protests, which have spread around the world and prompted companies to rethink their policies, from hiring practices to giving employees off for Juneteenth, the anniversary of the end of the slavery in the U.S.

Other companies said they are reconsidering racial imagery in their branding. 

The owner More

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