Displaying 51 - 60 of 5094
  • Saturday, Sep. 25, 2021
Actress Jessica Chastain receives an ex-aequo Donostia Shell award at the 69th San Sebastian Film Festival, in San Sebastian, northern Spain, Saturday Sept. 25, 2021. (AP Photo/Alvaro Barrientos)
SAN SEBASTIAN, Spain (AP) -- 

Female actors and filmmakers swept the top awards at the San Sebastian film festival on Saturday, with the Golden Shell for the best film going to "Blue Moon" ("Crai Nou") by Romanian director Alina Grigore.

American actress and producer Jessica Chastain was honored for her portrayal of Christian televangelist Tammy Faye Messner in "The Eyes of Tammy Faye" at the 69th edition of Spain's biggest film festival. 

Chastain shared the best leading performance award with 16-year-old Flora Ofelia Hofmann Lindahl, who starred in the Danish film "As in Heaven" ("Du som er i himlen"). Tea Lindeburg received the best director award for the same film.

It was the first time that the film festival gave gender neutral awards, without any separate categories for men and women.

Tatiana Huezo's "Prayers for the Stolen" ("Noche de fuego") won the prize for the best Latin American film.

Other winners included Claire Mathon, who received More

  • Friday, Sep. 24, 2021
Actor Michael K. Williams poses for a portrait at the Beverly Hilton during the 2016 Television Critics Association Summer Press Tour, Saturday, July 30, 2016, in Beverly Hills, Calif. Williams, 54, died of acute drug intoxication, New York City’s medical examiner said Friday, Sept. 24, 2021. Williams, known for playing Omar Little on “The Wire,” had fentanyl, parafluorofentanyl, heroin and cocaine in his system when he died Sept. 6 in Brooklyn. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello, File)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

Actor Michael K. Williams died of acute drug intoxication in what New York City's medical examiner said Friday was an accidental death.

Williams, known for playing Omar Little on "The Wire" and an Emmy Award nominee this year, had fentanyl, parafluorofentanyl, heroin and cocaine in his system when he died Sept. 6 in Brooklyn.

Williams, 54, was found dead by family members in his penthouse apartment. Police said at the time that they suspected a drug overdose. 

The city's Office of Chief Medical Examiner said it would not comment further. A message seeking comment was left with Williams' representative.

Williams had spoken frankly in interviews in recent years about his struggle with drug addiction, which he said persisted after he gained fame on "The Wire" in the early 2000s.

"I was playing with fire," he told the Newark Star-Ledger in 2012. "It was just a matter of time before I got caught and my business ended up on More

  • Thursday, Sep. 23, 2021
This June 7, 2017 file photo shows Roger Michell in London. Roger Michell, the British stage, television and film director whose movies include the hit romcom “Notting Hill,” has died. He was 65. Michell’s family announced his death on Wednesday Sept. 22, 2021 in a statement on Thursday. (Ian West/PA via AP, File)
LONDON (AP) -- 

Roger Michell, the British stage, television and film director whose movies include the indelibly popular romcom "Notting Hill," has died, his family said Thursday. He was 65.

Michell's family said in a statement that he died on Wednesday. They didn't disclose the place or cause of death.

"It is with great sadness that the family of Roger Michell, director, writer and father of Harry, Rosie, Maggie and Sparrow, announce his death at the age of 65 on September 22nd," said the statement released through Michell's publicist.

Born in South Africa, where his father was posted as a British diplomat, Michell began his directing career with British theaters including the Royal Court, the National Theatre and the Royal Shakespeare Company.

He made acclaimed television series in the 1990s, including adaptations of Hanif Kureishi's novel "The Buddha of Suburbia" and Jane Austen's "Persuasion."

On the big screen, his biggest More

  • Thursday, Sep. 23, 2021
Epic Games CEO Tim Sweeney enters the Ronald V. Dellums building in Oakland, Calif., on Friday, May 21, 2021. Sweeney said Wednesday, Sept. 22, 2021 it's been told by Apple that the game will be “blacklisted from the Apple ecosystem" until the companies' legal case is resolved and all appeals are exhausted, which could take as long as five years. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

Tim Sweeney, CEO of Fortnite maker Epic Games Inc., said Wednesday it's been told by Apple that the game will be "blacklisted from the Apple ecosystem" until the companies' legal case is resolved and all appeals are exhausted, which could take as long as five years. 

Sweeney posted on Twitter that Epic has asked Apple to reinstate Fortnite and promised "that it will adhere to Apple's guidelines whenever and wherever we release products on Apple's platforms."

"Apple spent a year telling the world, the court, and the press they'd 'welcome Epic's return to the App Store if they agree to play by the same rules as everyone else.' Epic agreed, and now Apple has reneged in another abuse of its monopoly power over a billion users," Sweeney tweeted. 

Apple declined to comment. 

Earlier this month, the federal judge overseeing the companies' legal scuffle ordered Apple to dismantle a lucrative part of the competitive barricade guarding More

  • Wednesday, Sep. 22, 2021
This July 17, 2017 file photo shows a Netflix logo on an iPhone in Philadelphia. Netflix said Wednesday Sept. 22, 2021, it has bought the works of Roald Dahl, the late British author of celebrated children's books such as “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory." (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
LONDON (AP) -- 

Netflix has acquired the works of Roald Dahl, the late British author of celebrated children's books such as "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory." 

The video streaming giant said Wednesday that it acquired the Roald Dahl Story Co., which manages the rights to author's characters and stories. No financial terms were disclosed. 

The deal builds on a partnership struck in 2018 to create a slate of animated TV series, under which "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" is getting a reboot by Academy Award winning filmmaker Taika Waititi and Netflix is working with Sony on an adaptation of "Mathilda the Musical." 

The new deal paves the way for Netflix to bring all of the author's back catalogue to screens. 

"These projects opened our eyes to a much more ambitious venture - the creation of a unique universe across animated and live action films and TV, publishing, games, immersive experiences, live theatre, consumer products and more More

  • Wednesday, Sep. 22, 2021
In this April 14, 2020 file photo, the thumbs up Like logo is shown on a sign at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. Facebook's semi-independent oversight board says it will review the company's “XCheck," or cross check system following an investigation by The Wall Street Journal into the use of an internal system that has exempted high-profile users from some or all of its rules. The board said Tuesday, Sept. 21, 2021, that it expects to have a briefing with Facebook on the matter and “will be reporting what we hear from this" as part of a report it will publish in October. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
MENLO PARK, Calif. (AP) -- 

Facebook's semi-independent oversight board says it will review the company's "XCheck," or cross check, system following an investigation by The Wall Street Journal into the use of this internal system that has exempted high-profile users from some or all of its rules. 

The board said Tuesday that it expects to have a briefing with Facebook on the matter and "will be reporting what we hear from this" as part of a report it will publish in October. It may also make other recommendations, although Facebook is not bound to follow these. 

The Journal's report found that many VIP users abuse the system, "posting material including harassment and incitement to violence that would typically lead to sanctions." For certain elite users, Facebook's rules don't seem to apply. Facebook Inc. had told The Journal that the system "was designed for an important reason: to create an additional step so we can accurately enforce policies on content that More

  • Tuesday, Sep. 21, 2021
Tom Hanks speaks at a press conference for the opening of the Academy Museum on Tuesday, Sept. 21, 2021, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP)
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- 

The projectors are rolling. The ruby slippers are on. Many an Oscar sits glistening. The shark has been hanging, and waiting, for nearly a year. 

Nine years after it was announced, four years after its first projected open date, and five months since its last planned launch date, the U.S. film academy's museum is ready to open to the public on Sept 30. 

"I'm very moved to be able to say to you, finally, at last, boy howdy hey, welcome to the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures," Tom Hanks told reporters Tuesday at a media preview of the Los Angeles building and its exhibits. 

Hanks, a member of the board of trustees, led the fundraising for the project along with fellow actor Annette Bening and Walt Disney Co. executive chairman Bob Iger. 

"We all know, films are made everywhere in the world, and they are wonderful films," Hanks said. "And there are other cities with film museums, but with all due respect, created by the Motion More

  • Tuesday, Sep. 21, 2021
Baltimore Ravens quarterback Lamar Jackson (8) rushes against Kansas City Chiefs defenders in the first half of an NFL football game, Sunday, Sept. 19, 2021, in Baltimore. This Sunday night football game on NBC topped the week's Nielsen ratings (AP Photo/Nick Wass)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

The Nielsen company, increasingly under fire from the television industry, on Tuesday said it would soon incorporate homes that have cut off cable in favor of broadband in its viewing measurements for local TV markets.

Nielsen estimates some 20% of American homes are now broadband only for onscreen entertainment. The company already includes these homes in its national TV measurements but in January will do so for local markets, giving TV stations a more complete picture of who's watching in order to sell ads.

"It's a big step to making sure that our measurement is really inclusive," said Catherine Herkovic, Nielsen managing director and executive vice president of local television.

The move comes as media companies have been more vocal in their unhappiness with Nielsen, which for decades has had a virtual monopoly on measuring television viewership, statistics used to govern billions of dollars in advertising spending.

More

  • Monday, Sep. 20, 2021
This April 27, 2021 file photo shows the login/sign up screen for a Twitter account on a laptop computer in Orlando, Fla. Twitter said Monday, Sept. 20, it will pay $809.5 million to settle a consolidated class action lawsuit alleging that the company misled investors about how much its user base was growing and how much users interacted with its platform. (AP Photo/John Raoux, File)
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- 

Twitter said Monday it will pay $809.5 million to settle a consolidated class action lawsuit alleging that the company misled investors about how much its user base was growing and how much users interacted with its platform. 

The San Francisco company said the proposed settlement, which must still be signed off by a judge, resolves all claims against it without Twitter admitting any wrongdoing. The original lawsuit filed in 2016 by Twitter investor Doris Shenwick claimed that Twitter executives "knowingly made inaccurate public statements regarding these metrics, and failed to disclose internal information about them, resulting in an inflated share price that fell when the truth about user engagement became known."

The company said it plans to use cash on hand to pay the settlement in the fourth quarter of 2021. It expects to record a one-time charge as a result. 

According to the lawsuit, in 2014 Twitter executives said that the More

  • Monday, Sep. 20, 2021
This July 9, 2015, file photo, shows signage outside Procter & Gamble corporate headquarters in downtown Cincinnati, USA. Computer-maker HP, consumer goods giant Procter & Gamble and coffee capsule company Nespresso have joined a corporate pledge to sharply cut their greenhouse gas emissions over the coming 20 years.The Climate Pledge, a grouping of companies and organizations spearheaded by Amazon, said Monday that it has signed up 86 new members for its voluntary measures. In total they now have 201 members with global annual revenues of more than $1.8 trillion. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
BERLIN (AP) -- 

Computer-maker HP, consumer goods business Procter & Gamble and coffee capsule company Nespresso have joined a corporate pledge to sharply cut their greenhouse gas emissions over nearly two decades.

The Climate Pledge, a grouping of companies and organizations spearheaded by Amazon, said Monday that it has signed up 86 new members for its voluntary measures. In total, the group now has 201 members with global annual revenues of more than $1.8 trillion, it said.

Other new members include telecoms company BT, truck-maker Scania and the Selfridges department store chain.

Together, the companies aim to cut almost 2 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide by 2040 — more than 5% of the current global total.

While the group's members are encouraged to eliminate as many emissions as possible, those that can't be avoided need to be completely offset in the next two decades. That means paying for measures to ensure as many emissions More

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