Displaying 1 - 10 of 6869
  • Monday, Jun. 17, 2024
Senate President Pro Tem Philip Baruth, D-Chittenden, left, and Lt. Gov. David Zuckerman speak during a veto override session on Monday, June 17, 2024, at the State House in Montpelier, Vt. The Democrat-controlled Vermont legislature has returned to the Statehouse to try to override Republican Gov. Phil Scott’s vetoes. (Jeb Wallace-Brodeur/The Times Argus via AP)

The Democratic-controlled Vermont Legislature on Monday overturned a number of the Republican governor's vetoes, passing measures to prevent drug overdoses, restrict a pesticide that's toxic to bees and to require state utilities to source all renewable energy by 2035.

But the Legislature failed to override Gov. Phil Scott's veto of a data privacy bill that was considered to be among the strongest in the country. It would have allowed consumers to file civil lawsuits against companies that break certain privacy rules. Scott vetoed the legislation last week, saying it would make Vermont "a national outlier and more hostile than any other state to many businesses and non-profits."

The Vermont House voted to override his veto but the Senate sustained his decision.

The vote came after the Legislature reconvened Monday to try to override Scott's vetoes of seven bills. Each chamber needed two-thirds of those present to vote to override to More

  • Monday, Jun. 17, 2024
British actor Ian McKellen poses in front of beach huts, on the Deauville promenade during the 41st American Film Festival, Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015, in Deauville, western France. McKellen has been hospitalized Monday, June 17, 2024, after toppling off a London stage during a fight scene in a play. The 85-year-old actor known for playing Gandalf in the “Lord of the Rings” films and his many stage roles was playing John Falstaff in a production of Player Kings at the Noel Coward Theatre. (AP Photo/Lionel Cironneau, File)
LONDON (AP) -- 

Actor Ian McKellen is expected to make a full recovery after he toppled off a London stage Monday during a fight scene and was hospitalized, a spokesperson said.

McKellen, 85, was in "good spirits" after doctors said a scan showed he was expected to fully recover from the fall, a spokesperson for the Noel Coward Theatre said.

The stage and screen veteran known for playing Gandalf in the "Lord of the Rings" films and many stage roles over a six decade career cried out in pain after the fall, according to a BBC journalist at the theater.

McKellen was playing John Falstaff in "Player Kings," a production of Henry IV, parts one and two, adapted and directed by Robert Icke, at the Noel Coward Theatre.

He lost his footing and fell off the stage in a scene with the Prince of Wales and Henry Percy. The tumble startled theatergoers.

"Sir Ian seemed to trip as he moved downstage to take a more active part in the scene," audience More

  • Monday, Jun. 17, 2024
British actor Ian McKellen poses in front of beach huts, on the Deauville promenade during the 41st American Film Festival, Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015, in Deauville, western France. McKellen has been hospitalized Monday, June 17, 2024, after toppling off a London stage during a fight scene in a play. The 85-year-old actor known for playing Gandalf in the “Lord of the Rings” films and his many stage roles was playing John Falstaff in a production of Player Kings at the Noel Coward Theatre. (AP Photo/Lionel Cironneau, File)
LONDON (AP) -- 

Actor Ian McKellen was hospitalized Monday after toppling off a London stage during a fight scene in a play.

The 85-year-old known for playing Gandalf in the "Lord of the Rings" films and many stage roles over a six decade career cried out in pain after the fall, according to a BBC journalist at the theater.

McKellen was playing John Falstaff in "Player Kings," a production of Henry IV, parts one and two, adapted and directed by Robert Icke, at the Noel Coward Theatre.

He lost his footing and fell off the stage in a scene with the Prince of Wales and Henry Percy. The tumble startled theatergoers.

"Sir Ian seemed to trip as he moved downstage to take a more active part in the scene," audience member Paul Critchley told the PA news agency, saying it was a shock. "He picked up momentum as he moved downstage which resulted in him falling off the stage directly in front of the audience."

The theater was evacuated and the More

  • Monday, Jun. 17, 2024
The U.S. Surgeon General's Warning appears on a pack of Camel cigarettes purchased at a Chicago area news stand on Nov. 30, 2012. In a Monday, June 17, 2024, opinion piece for The New York Times, Dr. Vivek Murthy has called on Congress to require warning labels on social media platforms similar to those now mandatory on cigarette boxes. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)

The U.S. surgeon general has called on Congress to require warning labels on social media platforms similar to those now mandatory on cigarette boxes.

In a Monday opinion piece in the The New York Times, Dr. Vivek Murthy said that social media is a contributing factor in the mental health crisis among young people.

"It is time to require a surgeon general's warning label on social media platforms, stating that social media is associated with significant mental health harms for adolescents. A surgeon general's warning label, which requires congressional action, would regularly remind parents and adolescents that social media has not been proved safe," Murthy said. "Evidence from tobacco studies show that warning labels can increase awareness and change behavior."

Murthy said that the use of just a warning label wouldn't make social media safe for young people, but would be a part of the steps needed.

Social media use is More

  • Monday, Jun. 17, 2024
The members of the company of "Stereophonic" perform during the 77th Tony Awards on Sunday, June 16, 2024, in New York. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

"The Outsiders," a gritty adaptation of the classic young adult novel, became the essence of a Broadway insider on Sunday, winning the Tony Award for best new musical on a night when women made strides.

The musical based on the beloved S. E. Hinton book is about rival gangs of haves and have-nots in 1960s Oklahoma. The win meant Angelina Jolie, a producer, landed her first Tony, too.

Producer Matthew Rego, in his acceptance speech, thanked Hinton, in the audience at Manhattan's Lincoln Center: "Susie, I'm here to tell you that your story and its eternal message of love and family and staying gold has forever changed all of our lives."

"Stereophonic," the play about a Fleetwood Mac-like band recording an album over a turbulent and life-changing year, won best new play and had the night's most total awards at five. It was written by David Adjmi, with songs by former Arcade Fire member Will Butler.

"Oh, no. My agent gave me a More

  • Sunday, Jun. 16, 2024
Novelist Haruki Murakami and film director Pierre Foldes shake hands at the end of a talk session after a screening of “Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman,” an animated film adapted from the Japanese author’s short stories, in Tokyo, June 15, 2024. (AP Photo/Mari Yamaguchi)
TOKYO (AP) -- 

Renowned Japanese author Haruki Murakami expressed joy with how several of his short stories were adapted in American director Pierre Földes' animated film "Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman," adding he wanted to see future interpretations of his work with filmmakers' own spin.

The Japanese language version of the 2022 film will be released for the first time in Japan on July 26. It is the first animated adaptation of Murakami's work.

After screening the film Saturday at his alma mater Waseda University in Tokyo, Murakami — joining Földes at a talk session — admitted that while he wasn't a fan of animated films, he watched it twice.

The filmmaker was inspired by six of Murakami's short stories: "Super-Frog Saves Tokyo" and "U.F.O. in Kushiro"— from "After the Quake," collection, written after the fatal 1995 Kobe earthquake — and "Birthday Girl," "Dabchick," "The Windup Bird and Tuesday's Women."

"Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman" is More

  • Saturday, Jun. 15, 2024
This photo provided by the Office of the New York Mayor, shows Mayor Eric Adams, left, presenting the Key to the City to hip-hop artist Sean "Diddy" Combs in New York's Times Square, Friday, Sept. 15, 2023. Combs has returned his key to New York City after a request from Adams in response to the release of a video showing the music mogul attacking R&B singer Cassie, officials said Saturday. (Office of the New York Mayor/Caroline Rubinstein-Willis via AP)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

Sean "Diddy" Combs has returned his key to New York City after a request from Mayor Eric Adams in response to the release of a video showing the music mogul attacking R&B singer Cassie, officials said Saturday.

The mayor's office said Combs returned the key after Adams sent letters to the embattled musician's offices in New York and California on June 4 rescinding the key and asking for it to be sent back to City Hall. The city received the key June 10.

In his letter, Adams wrote he was "deeply disturbed" by the attack, adding "I strongly condemn these actions and stand in solidarity with all survivors of domestic and gender-based violence."

Combs' career has been derailed by numerous accusations of sexual abuse, as well as a federal criminal sex-trafficking investigation that led to raids of Combs' mansions in Los Angeles and Miami.

In May, CNN aired security video of Combs attacking Cassie in a hotel hallway in Los More

  • Friday, Jun. 14, 2024
CEO and co-founder of Ozy Media Carlos Watson arrives at Brooklyn Federal Court, Friday, June 7, 2024 in New York. (AP Photo/Adam Gray)

Google CEO Sundar Pichai testified briefly Friday at the federal financial conspiracy trial surrounding buzz-to-bust startup Ozy Media, countering founder Carlos Watson's alleged claims that the search giant once sought to buy Ozy.

Google did consider hiring Watson for a high-level news executive job in 2021 and putting $25 million into Ozy in something of a tradeoff for luring him away, Pichai told jurors.

"Mr. Watson was a critical part of Ozy Media, and we were considering making an investment in the company to make the transition easier," he explained.

But "did you ever offer to purchase Ozy Media for $600 million?" prosecutor Dylan Stern asked.

"No," replied Pichai, who heads Google and parent Alphabet Inc.

He said he had been introduced to Watson at a conference and then in a video interview for a possible Google job interacting with news outlets. Neither the hire nor the $25 million investment ultimately More

  • Friday, Jun. 14, 2024
A woman types on a keyboard in New York, Oct. 8, 2019. Vermont’s governor on Thursday, June 12, 2024, vetoed a broad data privacy bill that would have been one of the strongest in the country to crack down on companies’ use of online personal data by letting consumers file civil lawsuits against companies that break certain privacy rules. (AP Photo/Jenny Kane, File)

Vermont's governor has vetoed a broad data privacy bill that would have been one of the strongest in the country to crack down on companies' use of online personal data by letting consumers file civil lawsuits against companies that break certain privacy rules.

Republican Gov. Phil Scott said in his veto message late Thursday that the legislation would have made Vermont "a national outlier and more hostile than any other state to many businesses and non-profits."

"I appreciate this provision is narrow in its impact, but it will still negatively impact mid-sized employers, and is generating significant fear and concern among many small businesses," he wrote.

The legislation would have prohibited the sale of sensitive data, such as social security and driver's license numbers, as well as financial information and health data. It also would have set meaningful limits on the amount of personal data that companies can collect and use, More

  • Friday, Jun. 14, 2024
Hannah Einbinder attends the 17th annual Chanel Tribeca Festival Artists Dinner at The Odeon on Monday, June 10, 2024, in New York. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- 

To rising comic Hannah Einbinder, her bits are for more than just laughs. She says her jokes are a coping mechanism she uses to process the tough topics she tackles in her material.

Einbinder, known for matching Jean Smart's quick wit and comedic timing in "Hacks," released her debut standup special on Max on Thursday to critical acclaim. Throughout her set, she takes on several difficult subjects, including sexual identity and climate change.

"Climate change is something that I think about every day when I look out the window at the Earth, before my eyes, so that is something that I definitely wanted to hit on," Einbinder tells The Associated Press. "It's just something that overwhelms my consciousness and so I write about it."

Einbinder says she thinks about "pretty much everything through the lens of comedy," adding that the habit is a "classic coping mechanism" or "survival instinct."

The special, "Everything Must Go," More

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