Displaying 1 - 10 of 5081
  • Saturday, Oct. 16, 2021
In this Jan. 28, 2018 file photo, Dave Chappelle poses in the press room with the best comedy album award for "The Age of Spin" and "Deep in the Heart of Texas" at the 60th annual Grammy Awards in New York. Netflix said Friday, Oct. 15, 2021 that it had fired an employee for disclosing confidential financial information about what it paid for Dave Chappelle’s comedy special “The Closer," which some condemned as being transphobic. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP, File)
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- 

Netflix said Friday that it had fired an employee for disclosing confidential financial information about what it paid for Dave Chappelle's comedy special "The Closer," which some condemned as being transphobic.

The employee, who wasn't named, shared "confidential, commercially sensitive information outside the company," a Netflix statement said.

"We understand this employee may have been motivated by disappointment and hurt with Netflix, but maintaining a culture of trust and transparency is core to our company," the statement said.

The statement said the information was referenced in a Bloomberg news article, which reported that Netflix spent $24.1 million on "The Closer," which first aired last week. The article also mentioned the lower budgets for a 2109 Chapelle special, a Bo Burnham special and the nine-episode hit "Squid Game."

Netflix said a review of its internal access logs pinpointed the information to a single More

  • Friday, Oct. 15, 2021
In this Feb. 24, 2020 file photo, former "Empire" actor Jussie Smollett leaves the Leighton Criminal Courthouse in Chicago. A judge on Friday, Oct. 15, 2021, denied a last-ditch effort to dismiss a criminal case against actor Jussie Smollett, who is accused of lying to police when he reported that two masked men attacked him in downtown Chicago. (AP Photo/Matt Marton, File)
CHICAGO (AP) -- 

A judge on Friday denied a last-ditch effort to dismiss a criminal case against actor Jussie Smollett, who is accused of lying to police when he reported that he was the victim of a racist, anti-gay attack in downtown Chicago in January 2019.

An attorney for the former "Empire" actor said Smollett's rights were being violated since he had already performed community service and given up a $10,000 bond under a previous deal with Cook County prosecutors to drop charges.

"A deal is a deal. That's ancient principle," attorney Nenye Uche said. 

But Judge James Linn noted that Smollett's case now was being led by a special prosecutor appointed by another judge, an arrangement that he would not upset.

Linn said jury selection in Smollett's trial would start Nov. 29.

Smollett, a gay Black man, told police in 2019 that two masked men attacked him when he was in Chicago working on "Empire." But he was charged weeks later with More

  • Friday, Oct. 15, 2021
Nne Ebong
NOHO ARTS DISTRICT, Calif. -- 

The Television Academy Foundation has named two new members to its board of directors: Nne Ebong, VP, overall deals, series at Netflix, and Jamila Hunter, executive VP of programming and development at Freeform, Disney General Entertainment’s young-adult network. Ebong and Hunter have been elected to three-year terms, effective immediately.

“We are thrilled to welcome Nne Ebong and Jamila Hunter to our board,” said Cris Abrego, chair of the Television Academy Foundation. “We look forward to implementing their collective expertise and strategic guidance in the Foundation’s future plans for educational programming and community outreach to help build a more inclusive and diverse television industry.”

As VP of overall deals, series at Netflix, Ebong is responsible for leading the development of series under creative partnerships with Shonda Rhimes’ Shondaland and President Barack Obama and Michelle Obama’s Higher Ground Productions, among More

  • Thursday, Oct. 14, 2021
Justin Corsbie (l) and Michael Dorman on the set of "Hard Luck Love Song"
LOS ANGELES -- 

Roadside Attractions releases writer/director Justin Corsbie’s award-winning Hard Luck Love Song in theaters nationwide on Friday (10/15). Corsbie’s debut feature stars Michael Dorman (Amazon’s Patriot), Sophia Bush (One Tree Hill), Dermot Mulroney (My Best Friend’s Wedding), Melora Walters (Boogie Nights), Brian Sacca (The Wolf of Wall Street), Eric Roberts (The Dark Knight) and hip-hop icon RZA (Wu-Tang Clan).

The screenplay was co-written by Corsbie and Craig Ugoretz, and the film was produced by Corsbie, Allison R. Smith and Douglas Matejka (A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Hunter Gatherer). Smith and Corsbie produced on behalf of their company Dime Box Entertainment, the film and TV arm of their commercial production company Synthetic Pictures, where Corsbie is the founding director, and Smith the executive producer.

Peter J. Scalettar (Wu-Tang Clan: Of Mics and Men More

  • Thursday, Oct. 14, 2021
John McGarry

John McGarry, a founding father of the venerable ad agency mcgarrybowen in 2002, passed away last week (10/7) at the age of 81 after a long battle with Parkinson’s

McGarry broke into the agency business as an account coordinator at Y&R New York. He rose up the ranks to become chairman and CEO of Y&R, which during his tenure was acquired by WPP. 

McGarry went on to team with Y&R cohorts, Gordon Bowen and Stewart Owen, to launch mcgarrybowen. McGarry was CEO of mcgarrybowen while Bowen served as chief creative officer and Owen as chief strategy officer. That shop became at one point the largest independent agency in New York and the 10th largest indie shop in the U.S., turning out work for such brands as Verizon, Disney, Kraft, United Airlines, Sears and Procter & Gamble.

Ultimately in 2008 Dentsu Holdings USA acquired mcgarrybowen and its digital arm Continuity. McGarry served as chairman and CEO of Dentsumcgarrybowen More

  • Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2021
In this March 20, 2018 file photo, Facebook's head of global safety policy Antigone Davis speaks during a roundtable on cyberbullying with first lady Melania Trump, in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington. Facebook will expand its policies on harassment to remove more harmful content, the company said Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2021 in its latest change following congressional testimony from a whistleblower who faulted the social media giant for not doing enough to stop harmful content. “We do not allow bullying and harassment on our platform, but when it does happen, we act,” Antigone Davis, Facebook’s head of global safety, wrote in a blog post.(AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
MENLO PARK, Calif. (AP) -- 

Facebook will expand its policies on harassment to remove more harmful content, the company said Wednesday in its latest change following congressional testimony from a whistleblower who faulted the social media giant for not doing enough to stop harmful content.

Under the new, more detailed harassment policy, Facebook will bar content that degrades or sexualizes public figures, including celebrities, elected officials and others in the public eye. Existing policies already prohibit similar content about private individuals.

Another change will add more protections from harassment to government dissidents, journalists and human rights activists around the world. In many nations, social media harassment has been used in efforts to silence journalists and activists.

Lastly, the company based in Menlo Park, California, announced it will ban all coordinated harassment, in which a group of individuals work together to bully another user More

  • Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2021
In this April 29, 2016, file photo, Mary Cain walks off the track after competing in the women's special 1500-meter run at the Drake Relays athletics meet in Des Moines, Iowa. Distance runner Mary Cain, whose career fizzled after what she has called four miserable years at the Nike Oregon Project, has filed a $20 million lawsuit against her former coach, Alberto Salazar, and their employer, Nike, Monday, Oct. 11, 2021. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File)
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) -- 

Distance runner Mary Cain, whose career fizzled after what she has called four miserable years at the Nike Oregon Project, has filed a $20 million lawsuit against her former coach, Alberto Salazar, and their employer, Nike.

Cain accused Salazar of emotionally abusing her when she joined the team in 2012 at age 16, The Oregonian/OregonLive reported. The lawsuit portrays Salazar as an angry control freak who was obsessed with Cain's weight and publicly humiliated her about it.

That, she said, took a toll on her physical and mental health. Nike was aware but failed to intervene, according to the lawsuit.

Nike did not return messages from the newspaper seeking comment. Salazar could not be reached but has previously denied abuse allegations, and has said neither Cain nor her parents raised concerns while she was part of the program.

In the lawsuit filed Monday in Multnomah County Circuit Court, Cain alleges Salazar on several More

  • Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2021
Mark Harmon appears in a scene from “NCIS.” (Michael Yarish/CBS)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

The lead character of television's most popular drama exited the show Monday without a fuss, and without the immediate ratings bump that would be expected if there had been.

"NCIS" star Mark Harmon, who has played Special Agent Leroy Jethro Gibbs since the CBS drama began in 2003, had his final night as a regular character on Monday's show. Gibbs informed his partner after working on a case in Alaska that he was going to stay there.

At Harmon's request, CBS made no special promotion of the occasion, a muted departure for an industry that has never been shy about hawking the movements of big stars.

That may partly be because Harmon, 70, hasn't ruled out the possibility of an occasional return.

"Our north star has always been staying true to our characters, and that truth has always guided the stories we tell and where those characters go," said Steve Binder, "NCIS" executive producer, in a statement. "So regarding the future More

  • Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2021
In this Tuesday, May 20, 2008, file photo, Brian Goldner, of Hasbro, stands next to some of the company's toy figures at Hasbro's headquarters, in Pawtucket, R.I. Toy and entertainment company Hasbro has announced that its CEO and chairman Brian D. Goldner has died at age 58. The announcement Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2021, comes two days after the company said Goldner was taking a medical leave of absence from his CEO role, effective immediately. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

Brian Goldner, who as CEO and chairman spearheaded Hasbro's transformation from a toy company to an entertainment force, has died. He was 58.

The announcement Tuesday came two days after the Pawtucket, Rhode Island, company said Goldner was taking a medical leave of absence. 

Hasbro did not give a cause of death, but Goldner disclosed in August 2020 that he had been undergoing treatment for cancer since 2014. 

Goldner, who joined Hasbro in 2000, served as the CEO of Hasbro Inc. since 2008, and as chairman since May 2015. 

Under his stewardship, Hasbro expanded beyond toys and games into television, movies, digital gaming and other areas. That strategy culminated with the 2019 acquisition Entertainment One Ltd., a British entertainment company that produces "Peppa Pig," "PJ Masks" and other animated shows for preschoolers.

Goldner also served on the board of ViacomCBS.

Marc Rosenberg, a toy consultant who closely More

  • Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2021
In this Jan. 29, 2016 file photo, Andy Parker and his wife, Barbara, listen as Virginia Gov. Terry McAulliffe announces a compromise on a set of gun bills at the Capitol in Richmond, Va. The family of a slain journalist is asking the Federal Trade Commission, Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2021, to take action against Facebook for failing to remove online footage of her shooting death. Andy Parker says the company is violating its own terms of service in hosting videos on Facebook and its sibling service Instagram that glorify violence. His daughter, TV news reporter Alison Parker, and cameraman Adam Ward were killed by a former co-worker while reporting for Roanoke, Virginia’s WDBJ-TV in August 2015. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
WASHINGTON (AP) -- 

The family of a slain journalist is asking the Federal Trade Commission to take action against Facebook for failing to remove online footage of her shooting death.

Andy Parker said Tuesday the company is violating its own terms of service in hosting videos on Facebook and its sibling service Instagram that glorify violence.

His daughter, TV news reporter Alison Parker, and cameraman Adam Ward were killed by a former co-worker while reporting for Roanoke, Virginia's WDBJ-TV in August 2015. Video footage of the shooting — some of which was taken by the gunman — repeatedly resurfaces on Facebook and Instagram despite assurances from top executives that it will be removed, says a complaint filed Tuesday by Parker and attorneys with the Georgetown Law Civil Rights Clinic.

"The reality is that Facebook and Instagram put the onus on victims and their families to do the policing of graphic content — requiring them to relive their worst More

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