Displaying 1 - 10 of 4828
  • Friday, Jun. 18, 2021
Maria Cabo
DETROIT -- 

Advertising agency Doner has appointed Maria Cabo as SVP, strategist, and Sky Downing as VP, strategy. In these new roles, both will help scale the integrated strategy group and add further expertise in transcultural insights, as the agency grows and adds several new clients to its roster. Cabo and Downing will report to chief strategy officer Jane Goodman.

Prior to joining Doner, Cabo held roles at independent agencies including d’expósito and Partners, Mythology/Partners and Spade, and Captura Group, where she focused on Hispanic and multicultural client work. Past clients include brands such as Tajín, Target, Warner Bros., Honey Bunches of Oats, and General Mills. She also has worked on the brand and media sides at MassMutual and Univision. Cabo additionally serves on The Hispanic Marketing Council and founded The Galician Film Festival.

With a career spanning North America, Europe and the Middle East, Downing is an accomplished More

  • Tuesday, Jun. 15, 2021
In this April 21, 2021, file photo, Lina Khan, nominee for Commissioner of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), speaks during her confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Khan was sworn in as FTC chair Tuesday, June 15, just hours after the Senate confirmed her nomination as a commissioner. (Saul Loeb/Pool via AP, File)
WASHINGTON (AP) -- 

President Joe Biden on Tuesday installed an energetic critic of Big Tech as a top federal regulator at a time when the industry is under intense pressure from Congress, regulators and state attorneys general. 

The selection of legal scholar Lina Khan to head the Federal Trade Commission is seen as signaling a tough stance toward tech giants Facebook, Google, Amazon and Apple. Khan was sworn in as FTC chair just hours after the Senate confirmed her as one of five members of the commission on a 69-28 vote. 

Khan, 32, has been a professor at Columbia University Law School and burst onto the antitrust scene with her massive scholarly work in 2017 as a Yale law student, "Amazon's Antitrust Paradox." She helped lay the foundation for a new way of looking at antitrust law beyond the impact of big-company market dominance on consumer prices. As counsel to a House Judiciary antitrust panel in 2019 and 2020, she played a key role in a sweeping More

  • Tuesday, Jun. 15, 2021
In this March 29, 2018, file photo is the Facebook logo on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite, in New York's Times Square. Facebook can face EU privacy challenges from watchdogs in any of the bloc's member states, not just its lead regulator in Ireland, the bloc's top court ruled Tuesday, June 16, 2021 in a ruling that could have implications for big tech companies. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
LONDON (AP) -- 

Facebook is subject to EU privacy challenges from watchdogs in any of the bloc's member states, not just its lead regulator in Ireland, the bloc's top court ruled Tuesday, in a ruling that has implications for other big tech companies. 

Under the EU's stringent privacy rules, known as the General Data Protection Regulation, only one country's national data protection authority has the power to handle legal cases involving cross-border data complaints in a system known as "one-stop shop." For Facebook, which has its European headquarters in Dublin, it is Ireland's Data Protection Commission. 

However, the European Union's Court of Justice ruled that "under certain conditions," a national watchdog has the power to take a company to court over a GDPR violation even if it's not the lead regulator. 

The ruling is in line with a preliminary opinion from a court adviser and, according to experts, potentially paves the way for a fresh More

  • Tuesday, Jun. 15, 2021
Actress Lisa Banes attends the opening night gala world premiere of "Gone Girl" during the 52nd New York Film Festival in New York on Sept. 26, 2014,. The "Gone Girl" and "Cocktail" actor has died after being injured in a hit-and-run accident in New York. A police spokesperson says the 65-year-old Banes died Monday, June 15, 2021, at Mount Sinai Morningside Hospital. She was struck by a scooter or motorcycle while crossing a street on June 4. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

"Gone Girl" actor Lisa Banes died 10 days after being injured in a hit-and-run accident in New York City, police said.

The 65-year-old Banes, who was  struck by a scooter or motorcycle  while crossing a street on June 4, died Monday at Mount Sinai Morningside Hospital, a police department spokesperson said.

Banes appeared in numerous television shows and movies, including "Gone Girl" in 2014 and "Cocktail" with Tom Cruise in 1988. On television, she had roles on "Nashville," "Madam Secretary," "Masters of Sex" and "NCIS."

She acted on stage regularly, including Broadway appearances in the Neil Simon play "Rumors" in 1988, in the musical "High Society" in 1998 and in the Noel Coward play "Present Laughter" in 2010.

Her manager, David Williams, said Banes was hit as she was crossing Amsterdam Avenue on the way to visit the Juilliard School, her alma mater.

Banes lived in Los Angeles and was married to Kathryn Kranhold, a More

  • Monday, Jun. 14, 2021
Tommy Harden (l) and Peter Wiedensmith
PORTLAND, Ore. -- 

Editors Peter Wiedensmith and Tommy Harden--two former mainstays of JOINT Editorial, Wieden+Kennedy’s fully owned yet independently operated postproduction company--have teamed to launch Portland-based post shop ACADEMY. The new venture is focused on working with creative agencies and directors while nurturing up-and-coming editors through education and experience.

Wiedensmith and Harden were JOINT veterans--Wiedensmith serving as founder dating back some 25 years, while Harden was an editor there for 14 years. At JOINT, they worked on spots that earned three Emmys--for the 2011 Chrysler “Born of Fire” spot, P&G’s “Best Job” campaign celebrating Olympic athletes and their mothers, and the more recent awards-sweeping Nike “Dream Crazy” ad. Wiedensmith and Harden additionally turned out projects that were nominated for three Emmys combined, including the famed Nike spot “Hello World” starring Tiger Woods, and Chrysler’s “Half Time in America” More

  • Monday, Jun. 14, 2021
In this Monday, Nov. 5, 2018 file photo, a woman walks past the logo for Google at the China International Import Expo in Shanghai. Google has on Friday, June 11, 2021 promised to give U.K. regulators a role overseeing its plan to phase out existing ad-tracking technology from its Chrome browser as the tech giant seeks to resolve a competition investigation. The U.K. competition watchdog has been investigating Google's proposals to remove so-called third-party cookies over concerns they would undermine digital ad competition and entrench the company's market power. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
LONDON (AP) -- 

Google is offering U.K. regulators a role overseeing its phasing out of ad-tracking technology from its Chrome browser, in a package of commitments the tech giant is proposing to apply globally to head off a competition investigation. 

The U.K. competition watchdog has been investigating Google's proposals to remove so-called third-party cookies over concerns they would undermine digital ad competition and entrench the company's market power. 

To address the concerns, Google on Friday offered a set of commitments including giving the Competition and Markets Authority an oversight role as the company designs and develops a replacement technology. 

"The emergence of tech giants such as Google has presented competition authorities around the world with new challenges that require a new approach," Andrea Coscelli, the watchdog's chief executive, said. 

The Competition and Markets Authority will work with tech companies to "shape More

  • Friday, Jun. 11, 2021
May 25, 2020 image from a police body camera shows bystanders including Darnella Frazier, third from right filming, as former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was recorded pressing his knee on George Floyd's neck. (Minneapolis Police Department via AP, File)
Minneapolis (AP) -- 

The teenager who pulled out her cellphone and began recording when she saw George Floyd being pinned to the ground by a Minneapolis police officer was given a special citation by the Pulitzer Prizes on Friday for her video that helped to launch a global movement to protest racial injustice.  Darnella Frazier was cited "for courageously recording the murder of George Floyd, a video that spurred protests against police brutality, around the world, highlighting the crucial role of citizens in journalists' quest for truth and justice," the Pulitzer Prizes said.

Frazier was 17 when she recorded the arrest and death of Floyd, a 46-year-old Black man, on May 25, 2020. She testified at the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin that she was walking to a corner grocery store to get snacks with her then-9-year-old cousin when she saw a man being pinned to the pavement, "terrified, scared, begging for his life." She said she didn't want More

  • Friday, Jun. 11, 2021
Anders Hammer, director of "Do Not Split," an Oscar-nominated documentary about the 2019 protests in Hong Kong speaks during an interview in Oslo, Norway, April 7, 2021. Hong Kong censors now have the power to ban films that endanger national security, prompting concerns that freedom of expression is being further curtailed in a city once known for its vibrant arts and film scene. “This film censorship system shows how freedom of expression is disappearing from Hong Kong," said Hammer recently. (AP Photo)
HONG KONG (AP) -- 

Hong Kong censors now have the power to ban films that endanger national security, prompting concerns that freedom of expression is being further curtailed in a city once known for its vibrant arts and film scene.

Authorities are cracking down on criticism of Chinese Communist Party rule, arresting many pro-democracy activists in the city and implementing a sweeping national security law last year that criminalizes actions such as the calls for independence during months of anti-government protests in 2019.

The Hong Kong government announced Friday that it has amended the guidelines for censors in the city’s Film Censorship Ordinance to include vigilance against any “portrayal, depiction or treatment of any act or activity which may amount to an offense endangering national security.”

Censors have the power to deem films unsuitable for exhibition to “prevent or suppress any act or activity endangering national security,” it said in More

  • Friday, Jun. 11, 2021
In this Sept. 4, 2014, file photo, director Andrew Niccol poses for portraits during the 71st edition of the Venice Film Festival in Venice, Italy. Hollywood news outlet Deadline reported that Niccol would write and direct the movie “They Are Us,” which was being shopped by New York-based FilmNation Entertainment to international buyers. (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis, File)
WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) -- 

Tentative plans for a movie that recounts the response of Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern to a gunman's slaughter of Muslim worshippers drew criticism in New Zealand on Friday for not focusing on the victims of the attacks.

Hollywood news outlet Deadline reported that Australian actor Rose Byrne was set to play Ardern in the movie “They Are Us,” which was being shopped by New York-based FilmNation Entertainment to international buyers.

The movie would be set in the days after the 2019 attacks in which 51 people were killed at two Christchurch mosques.

Deadline said the movie would follow Ardern's response to the attacks and how people rallied behind her message of compassion and unity, and her successful call to ban the deadliest types of semiautomatic weapons.

The title of the movie comes from the words Ardern spoke in a landmark address soon after the attacks. At the time, Ardern was praised around the world More

  • Wednesday, Jun. 9, 2021
Icons for the smartphone apps TikTok and WeChat are seen on a smartphone screen in Beijing, in a Friday, Aug. 7, 2020 file photo. Officials say the White House has dropped Trump-era executive orders that attempted to ban the popular apps TikTok and WeChat and will conduct its own review aimed at identifying national security risks with software applications tied to China. A new executive order directs the Commerce Department to undertake what officials describe as an “evidence-based” analysis of transactions involving apps that are manufactured or supplied or controlled by China. Officials are particularly concerned about apps that collect users’ personal data or have connections to Chinese military or intelligence activities. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
WASHINGTON (AP) -- 

The White House dropped Trump-era executive orders that attempted to ban the popular apps TikTok and WeChat and will conduct its own review aimed at identifying national security risks with software applications tied to China, officials said Wednesday.

A new executive order directs the Commerce Department to undertake what officials describe as an "evidence-based" analysis of transactions involving apps that are manufactured or supplied or controlled by China. Officials are particularly concerned about apps that collect users' persona data or have connections to Chinese military or intelligence activities.

The department also will make recommendations on how to further protect Americans' genetic and personal health information, and will address the risks of certain software apps connected to China or other adversaries, according to senior administration officials.

TikTok on Wednesday declined to comment. WeChat did not respond to a More

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