Displaying 1 - 10 of 4151
  • Wednesday, Jun. 3, 2020
In this April 29, 2020 file photo, a message on the ticket window at the AMC Burbank 16 movie theaters complex informs potential customers that it is currently closed in Burbank, Calif. AMC says its business is suffering because of the coronavirus pandemic and it may not survive. All of the company’s theaters are shut down through June, and while the theaters are closed the company is generating no revenue. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello, File)

Movie theater chain AMC warned Wednesday that it may not survive the coronavirus pandemic, which has shuttered its theaters and led film studios to explore releasing more movies directly to viewers over the internet.

All of AMC's theaters are shut down through June, which means the company isn't generating any revenue. AMC said it had enough cash to reopen its theaters this summer, as it plans to do. But if it's not allowed to reopen, it will need more money, which it may not be able to borrow. 

The company said that even when local governments allow theaters to reopen, AMC may still have problems if entertainment companies delay releasing new films.

"Due to these factors, substantial doubt exists about our ability to continue as a going concern for a reasonable period of time," AMC wrote in a regulatory filing.

And people may not want to go sit in crowded spaces because they fear the virus. AMC believes that desire for More

  • Tuesday, Jun. 2, 2020
This Oct. 16, 2017 file photo shows Dick Wolf at the Broadcasting & Cable Hall of Fame Awards 27th Anniversary Gala in New York. (Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/AP, File)
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- 

A TV writer who has worked on "S.W.A.T." and "Chicago P.D." was fired from an upcoming "Law & Order" spin-off because of online posts about social unrest in Los Angeles.

Craig Gore was dropped from NBC's "Law & Order: Organized Crime" by franchise creator Dick Wolf.

"I will not tolerate this conduct, especially during our hour of national grief. I am terminating Craig Gore immediately," Wolf said in a statement.

An attorney for Gore didn't immediately respond Tuesday to a request for comment. NBC declined to comment.

In a post circulated on social media Tuesday and captioned "Curfew…" Gore is shown holding a firearm. In another post, he wrote that famed Sunset Boulevard was being "looted two blocks from me," and added, "You think I won't light (expletive) up who are are trying to (expletive) w/ my property I worked all my life for? Think again."

As with other U.S. cities, Los Angeles has seen both peaceful More

  • Tuesday, Jun. 2, 2020
This April 26, 2017, file photo shows the Twitter app icon on a mobile phone in Philadelphia. A tech-focused civil liberties group on Tuesday, June 2, 2020, sued to block President Donald Trump's executive order that seeks to regulate social media, saying it violates the First Amendment and chills speech. Trump's order, signed in late May, could allow more lawsuits against internet companies like Twitter and Facebook for what their users post, tweet and stream. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

A tech-focused civil liberties group on Tuesday sued to block President Donald Trump's executive order that seeks to regulate social media, saying it violates the First Amendment and chills speech.

Trump's order, signed last week, could allow more lawsuits against internet companies like Twitter and Facebook for what their users post, tweet and stream. 

The order was more political than substantive, with many experts questioning whether it was constitutional. The president aimed to rally his supporters after Twitter put fact checks on two of his tweets. Trump, without evidence, has long accused tech companies of being biased against conservatives. 

The order targets current law — you may have heard recent references to Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act — that protects internet companies from lawsuits. They can't be sued for hosting videos and posts from users, or for moderating their services, with some exceptions.  More

  • Tuesday, Jun. 2, 2020
This image released by Warner Bros Pictures shows Jamie Foxx in a scene from "Just Mercy." The 2019 film, which chronicles courtroom struggles against racial injustice and mass incarceration, will be made free on digital platforms in the wake of George Floyd’s death. (Jake Netter/Warner Bros. Pictures via AP)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

The 2019 film "Just Mercy," which chronicles courtroom struggles against racial injustice and mass incarceration, will be made free on digital platforms throughout June in the wake of George Floyd's death, Warner Bros. said Tuesday. 

In the film, Michael B. Jordan plays attorney Bryan Stevenson, founder of the Equal Justice Initiative, who helps a character played by Jamie Foxx. It's based on Stevenson's 2014 memoir "Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption," one of the books that has rocketed to the top of best-seller lists  as protests have swept the country. 

"We believe in the power of story," Warner Bros. said. "Our film 'Just Mercy,' based on the life work of civil rights attorney Bryan Stevenson, is one resource we can humbly offer to those who are interested in learning more about the systemic racism that plagues our society."

"Just Mercy,"  released in December, was the first studio project made with the inclusion More

  • Tuesday, Jun. 2, 2020
In this July 20, 2017, file photo, Carole Baskin, founder of Big Cat Rescue, walks the property near Tampa, Fla. A federal judge in Oklahoma has awarded ownership of the zoo made famous in Netflix's “Tiger King” docuseries to Joe Exotic's rival, Carole Baskin. In a ruling Monday, June 1, 2020, U.S. District Judge Scott Palk granted control of the Oklahoma zoo that was previously run by Joseph Maldonado-Passage — also known as Joe Exotic — to Big Cat Rescue Corp. (Loren Elliott/Tampa Bay Times via AP, File)
WYNNEWOOD, Okla. (AP) -- 

A federal judge in Oklahoma has awarded ownership of the zoo made famous in Netflix's "Tiger King" docuseries to Joe Exotic's chief rival.

In a ruling Monday, U.S. District Judge Scott Palk granted control of the Oklahoma zoo that was previously run by Joseph Maldonado-Passage — also known as Joe Exotic — to Big Cat Rescue Corp.

The Florida group was founded by Carole Baskin, who also featured prominently in the hit Netflix series. Maldonado-Passage is currently serving a 22-year federal prison term for killing five tigers and plotting to have Baskin killed.

Baskin previously sued Maldonado-Passage for trademark and copyright infringements and won a $1 million civil judgment against him. Palk's judgment Monday found that ownership of the zoo was fraudulently transferred to Maldonado-Passage's mother in an attempt to avoid paying the judgment.

The decision said the zoo animals must be removed from the property within 120 days More

  • Tuesday, Jun. 2, 2020
People take part in a Black Lives Matter protest in Amsterdam, Netherlands, Monday, June 1, 2020, to protest against the recent killing of George Floyd, a black man who died in police custody in Minneapolis, U.S.A., after being restrained by police officers on Memorial Day. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

Though Black Out Tuesday was originally organized by the music community, the social media world also went dark in support of the Black Lives Matter movement, joining voices around the world outraged by the killings of black people in the U.S.

Instagram and Twitter accounts, from top record label to everyday people, were full of black squares posted in response to the deaths of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery and Breonna Taylor.

Most of the captions were blank, though some posted #TheShowMustBePaused, black heart emojis or encouraged people to vote Tuesday with seven states and the District of Columbia are hosting the largest slate of presidential primary elections in almost three months.

Rihanna, Alicia Keys, Radiohead, Coldplay, Kelly Rowland, Beastie Boys and were among the celebrities to join Black Out Tuesday on social media.

"I won't be posting on social media and I ask you all to do the same," Britney Spears tweeted. "We More

  • Tuesday, Jun. 2, 2020
This image released by PBS Kids shows characters from the TV series "Hero Elementary," from left, Lucita Sky, Benny Bubbles, Sara Snap and AJ Gadgets, a superhero who has the ability to make super gadgets – and who also happens to be on the Autism spectrum. The series premieres Monday, June 1 on PBS stations. (PBS Kids via AP)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

There's a new crop of superheroes coming to our TV this summer but they may need a little seasoning. After all, they're only in elementary school.

The PBS Kids' animated series " Hero Elementary " is set inside a grade school where a diverse group of four superhero students are learning to master their special powers. 

There's a kid who can fly but is afraid of heights. There's a girl with the power to teleport and a boy who creates forcefields of bubbles. Plus there's a boy with an array of cool gadgets who is on the autism spectrum. 

The creators have been subtle about how they've portrayed the character of AJ Gadgets, who is on the high-functioning end of the spectrum. AJ doesn't like loud noises or wet clothes or to be apart from his beloved backpack. But he's part of the team and always comes to the rescue. 

"We feel like there is so much strength in the idea of portraying a kid on the spectrum as just one of the kids More

  • Monday, Jun. 1, 2020
NEW YORK -- 

For the first time in its five-year history, the global Next Creative Leaders competition run jointly by The One Club for Creativity and The 3% Movement has expanded its diversity and inclusion remit to accept entries from both womxn and non-binary creatives.  

The call for entries is now open for the 2020 Next Creative Leaders (NCL), a portfolio competition that identifies, celebrates and gives a global platform to talented womxn creatives who are making their mark on the world with both their work and a unique point of view on creative leadership that’s changing the industry for the better.  

“As a program focused on inclusion and diversity, it was important to expand the scope of eligibility to also include non-binary creatives,” said Kasia Karolak, gender equality program manager, The One Club.

Also new for 2020 is the addition of NCL regional honors.  Along with naming 10 global winners based upon the highest scores from judges More

  • Friday, May. 29, 2020
In this March 13, 2018, file photo, actress Oprah Winfrey poses for photographers upon arrival at the premiere of the film "A Wrinkle In Time" in London. The Grammys is putting together an event featuring Winfrey, Brad Pitt, Herbie Hancock and Harry Connick, Jr. to honor essential workers across America. (Photo by Joel C Ryan/Invision/AP, File)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

The Grammys is putting together an event featuring Brad Pitt, Oprah Winfrey, Herbie Hancock and Harry Connick, Jr. to honor essential workers across America.

The Recording Academy, which puts on the Grammy Awards annually, announced Thursday that the two-hour special, "United We Sing: A Grammy Salute to the Unsung Heroes," will air June 21 on CBS.

"United We Sing" will follow Connick Jr. — who is hosting — and his filmmaker-daughter Georgia Connick on a road trip celebrating and thanking essential workers during the coronavirus pandemic. 

Winfrey, Pitt, Sandra Bullock, Queen Latifah, Renée Zellweger and Drew Brees will also deliver special messages to workers. 

The event will also feature performances by Hancock, John Fogerty, Jamie Foxx, Cyndi Lauper, Dave Matthews, Branford Marsalis, Wynton Marsalis, Tim McGraw, Little Big Town, Andra Day, Irma Thomas, Trombone Shorty, Rockin Dopsie, Jon Batiste and Connick Jr. 

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  • Wednesday, May. 27, 2020
This March 11, 2019 file photo shows Gabrielle Union at the "America's Got Talent" Season 14 Kickoff in Pasadena, Calif. An investigation of Gabrielle Union’s complaints of racism on the set of “America’s Got Talent” concluded that her allegations were unfounded, according to NBC and the show’s producers. The outside investigator also concluded that her claims had “no bearing” on the show’s decision to drop her as a judge, the network and production companies FremantleMedia and Syco said in a joint statement Wednesday. (Photo by Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP, File)
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- 

An investigation of Gabrielle Union's complaints of racism on the set of "America's Got Talent" concluded that her allegations were unfounded, according to NBC and the show's producers.

The outside review also said that Union's claims had "no bearing" on the show's decision to drop her as a judge, the network and production companies FremantleMedia and Syco said in a joint statement Wednesday. Syco is series host and producer Simon Cowell's joint venture with Sony Music.

Union, known for her roles in the films "Bring It On" and "Bad Boys II," appeared on the talent showcase for a season, until she and fellow freshman judge Julianne Hough weren't asked to return. 

The trade publication Variety reported that Union, who is black, believed she was fired because she had asked NBC and the show's producers to respond to an environment that tolerated racist jokes and remarks. That included what Union said were multiple notes from producers More

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