Displaying 1 - 10 of 4263
  • Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020
This image released by Disney shows Yifei Liu in the title role of "Mulan." The film is no longer headed for a major theatrical release. The Walt Disney Co. said Tuesday that it will debut its live-action blockbuster on its subscription streaming service, Disney+, on Sept. 4. Customers will have to pay an additional $29.99 on top of the cost of the monthly subscription to rent “Mulan.” (Disney Enterprises, Inc. via AP)

"Mulan" is no longer headed for a major theatrical release. The Walt Disney Co. said Tuesday that it will debut its live-action blockbuster on its subscription streaming service, Disney+, on Sept. 4. 

But this is no "Hamilton": Customers will have to pay an additional $29.99 on top of the cost of the monthly subscription to rent "Mulan."

The company plans to release it in theaters in areas where Disney+ is not available. 

"Mulan," a live-action remake of the animated film, was one of the first films affected by the coronavirus pandemic and the closure of theaters. Originally set for a late March release, the blockbuster has been delayed four times since. 

"In order to meet the needs of consumers during this unpredictable period, we thought it was important to find alternative ways to bring this exceptional family-friendly film to them in a timely manner," Disney CEO Bob Chapek said on the company's earnings call. "We see this More

  • Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020
Park guests enter the Magic Kingdom during the reopening of Walt Disney World, Saturday, July 11, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. Walt Disney Co. reported net income that plummeted dramatically in the third quarter, when it most of its theme parks remained closed and theatrical movie releases were postponed. Net income results were better than the loss analysts expected, however, but revenue missed expectations. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
BURBANK, Calif. (AP) -- 

Walt Disney Co. on Tuesday reported that its net income plummeted dramatically in the three-month period that ended in June when it most of its theme parks were shuttered and theatrical movie releases were postponed.

Still, its bottom-line results were better than analysts expected, although its revenue missed expectations.

Disney has soared to success with the breadth of its media and entertainment offerings, but now it's trying to recover after the coronavirus pandemic pummeled many of its businesses. It was hit by several months of its parks and stores being closed, cruise ships idled, movie releases postponed and a halt in film and video production.

For quarter that ended June 27, the company posted a loss of $4.84 billion, or $2.61 per share, compared to a profit of 79 cents in the prior year quarter. Adjusted to exclude one-time items such as restructuring costs and impairment charges, it net income came to 8 cents per share. More

  • Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020
In this April 30, 2015, file photo, a woman sits near the logo of Sony Corp. in Tokyo. Japanese electronics and entertainment company Sony Corp. said Tuesday that its April-June profit jumped 53% as its video-game and other online businesses thrived with people staying home due to the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)
TOKYO (AP) -- 

Japanese electronics and entertainment company Sony Corp. said Tuesday that its April-June profit jumped 53% as its video game and other online businesses thrived with people staying home due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Tokyo-based Sony reported a 233 billion yen ($2.2 billion) profit for the last quarter, up from 152 billion yen the year before.

Sony warned that its movies division would likely suffer for two or three years due to delays in film projects and limits to theater seating because of the pandemic. 

Consumer demand for electronics products has also plunged, including sales of digital cameras, TVs and other gadgets, according to Sony. 

Some factories in China and Malaysia were temporarily shut down and an inability for some employees to travel also was a hindrance, the company said. 

Sony's quarterly sales edged up 2% to 1.97 trillion yen ($18.6 billion). 

Earlier this year, Sony unveiled a prototype More

  • Monday, Aug. 3, 2020
Golden Globes signage appears on the red carpet at the 76th annual Golden Globe Awards on Jan. 6, 2019, in Beverly Hills, Calif. A Norwegian entertainment reporter has sued the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, the organization that gives out the Golden Globe Awards, alleging that it acts as a cartel that stifles competition for its members. Reporter Kjersti Flaa filed the lawsuit in federal court in Los Angeles on Monday. Flaa said that despite reporting on Hollywood for many prominent Norwegian outlets, she has been repeatedly denied membership in the organization because the HFPA won't allow in new members whose work competes with that of existing ones. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File)
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- 

A Norwegian entertainment reporter on Monday sued the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, the organization that gives out the Golden Globe Awards, alleging that it acts as a cartel that stifles competition for its members. 

Reporter Kjersti Flaa, filed the lawsuit in federal court in Los Angeles, saying that despite reporting on Hollywood for many prominent Norwegian outlets, she has been repeatedly denied membership in the organization. Her suit contends the HFPA consistently rejects qualified new applicants like herself whose work competes with that of existing members.

The suit alleges the organization allocates foreign markets among its members, requires new applicants to pledge not to write for any publication claimed by a member or a rival of that publication, and denies applications that might compete in a market claimed by one of its members. 

"Qualified applicants for admission to the HFPA are virtually always rejected More

  • Monday, Aug. 3, 2020
Trey Burvant
BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) -- 

Louisiana has released coronavirus safety guidelines for movie and TV productions as filming is expected to start returning to the virus outbreak hot spot this month.

Louisiana's economic development department issued the rules Monday.

The regulations say movie and TV productions should have a coronavirus compliance officer, provide testing for workers and require everyone except performers to wear masks. The department calls for using temperature checks to enter production areas, distancing people at the locations and using digital scripts when possible.

Most filming in Louisiana has been on hold since March. But Louisiana's economic development department says some productions are readying to resume filming this month and in September.

Trey Burvant, president of the Louisiana Film and Entertainment Association, said 15 shows were filming in the state before the pandemic. 

Louisiana has had one of the highest per More

  • Monday, Aug. 3, 2020
This photo provided by Milk Processor Education Program. shows Ju Ju Smith-Schuster of the Pittsburgh Steelers in a milk commercial. The dairy industry has a familiar question for you: “Got milk?” Six years after the popular tagline was retired, “Got milk?” ads are back. The dairy industry is reviving the campaign hoping to prolong the U.S. sales boost milk has gotten during the pandemic. (Milk Processor Education Program via AP)

The dairy industry has a familiar question for you: "Got milk?"

Six years after the popular tagline was retired, "Got milk?" ads are back. A dairy industry-funded group is reviving the campaign, hoping to prolong the boost milk has gotten during the pandemic.

U.S. milk sales have been in freefall for decades as choices grew and consumers turned to soda, juices and plant-based alternatives like soy milk. Dean Foods, the nation's biggest milk producer, filed for bankruptcy protection in November. Borden Dairy, another major producer, followed with its own bankruptcy in January.

But then came the coronavirus pandemic, and milk sales saw a sharp rise. Kids who were no longer having meals at school were drinking milk at home. Adults — no longer commuting — had time for a leisurely bowl of cereal. Many people were buying milk to bake and cook at home.

Unlike the original "Got milk?" campaign, which debuted in 1994 and was known for More

  • Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020
In this Monday, Dec. 14, 2009 file photo, Actor Wilford Brimley attends the premiere of 'Did You Hear About The Morgans' at the Ziegfeld Theater in New York. Wilford Brimley, who worked his way up from stunt performer to star of film such as “Cocoon” and “The Natural,” has died. He was 85. Brimley’s manager Lynda Bensky said the actor died Saturday morning, Aug. 1, 2020 in a Utah hospital. (AP Photo/Evan Agostini, File)
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- 

Wilford Brimley, who worked his way up from stunt performer to star of films such as "Cocoon" and "The Natural," has died. He was 85.

Brimley's manager Lynda Bensky said the actor died Saturday morning in a Utah hospital. He was on dialysis and had several medical ailments, she said.

The mustached Brimley was a familiar face for a number of roles, often playing gruff characters like his grizzled baseball manager in "The Natural."

Brimley's best-known work was in "Cocoon," in which he was part of a group of seniors who discover an alien pod that rejuvenates them. The 1985 Ron Howard film won two Oscars, including a supporting actor honor for Don Ameche.

Brimley also starred in "Cocoon: The Return," a 1988 sequel. 

For years he was pitchman for Quaker Oats and in recent years appeared in a series of diabetes spots that turned him at one point into a social media sensation.

"Wilford Brimley was a man you could More

  • Thursday, Jul. 30, 2020
Ellen DeGeneres attends the premiere of Netflix's "Green Eggs and Ham," on Nov. 3, 2019, in Los Angeles. DeGeneres apologized to the staff of her daytime TV talk show amid an internal company investigation of complaints of a difficult and unfair workplace. (Photo by Mark Von Holden /Invision/AP, File)
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- 

Ellen DeGeneres apologized to the staff of her daytime TV talk show amid an internal company investigation of complaints of a difficult and unfair workplace.

"On day one of our show, I told everyone in our first meeting that 'The Ellen DeGeneres Show' would be a place of happiness — no one would ever raise their voice, and everyone would be treated with respect," DeGeneres wrote. Something changed, she said, "and for that, I am sorry."

In a separate statement, the Warner Bros. studio said the investigation's "primary findings" revealed what it called some flaws in the show's daily management.

DeGeneres' memo and the probe by the studio's parent company followed a BuzzFeed News report  in which one current and 10 former show employees complained about issues including being fired after taking medical or bereavement leave. One worker said she left because of comments about her race. 

Most of the complaints were tied to More

  • Thursday, Jul. 30, 2020
Lady Gaga arrives at the Governors Awards in Los Angeles on Nov. 18, 2018, left, and Ariana Grande arrives at the 62nd annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles on Jan. 26, 2020. Lady Gaga and Ariana Grande both scored nine VMA nominations each, including video of the year for their No. 1 dance hit. “Rain on Me” is also competing for song of the year, best collaboration, best pop, best cinematography, best visual effects and best choreography. The 2020 MTV Video Music Awards will air live on Aug. 30 from the Barclays Center in Brooklyn.(Photos by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

It's raining nominations for Lady Gaga and Ariana Grande's "Rain on Me" at the 2020 MTV Video Music Awards, which will present new categories focused on live performances and music videos created at home during the coronavirus pandemic.

Gaga and Grande both scored nine nominations each, including video of the year for their No. 1 dance hit. "Rain on Me" is also competing for song of the year, best collaboration, best pop, best cinematography, best visual effects and best choreography.

Billie Eilish and The Weekend, the second-most nominated acts with six, are also up for video of the year with "everything i wanted" and "Blinding Lights." Others nominated for the top prize include Taylor Swift's "The Man," Future and Drake's "Life Is Good" and Eminem's "Godzilla," which features late rapper Juice WRLD. 

The VMAs, to air live on Aug. 30 from the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, introduces two new categories reflecting the current pandemic More

  • Thursday, Jul. 30, 2020
Spike Lee
HOLLYWOOD, Calif. -- 

Spike Lee, winner of an honorary Oscar in 2016 and three years later a Best Adapted Screenplay Academy Award for BlacKkKlansman, will receive the esteemed Trailblazer Award from the Location Managers Guild International (LMGI) at the 7th Annual LMGI Awards celebrating the theme “2020 Vision: We See It First.” The 2020 Awards, hosted by Isaiah Mustafa, will honor the spectrum of Lee’s extraordinary award-winning work over the past three decades on Saturday, October 24 at 2:00 PM PST during a virtual ceremony. 
 
Awards co-chair and former LMGI president Lori Balton commented, “We are especially grateful that Mr. Lee has brought so much diverse talent into the industry. Actors like Samuel Jackson, Rosie Perez and Giancarlo Esposito, but also so many of us working behind the scenes--Wynn Thomas, Ruth Carter, Ernest Dickerson and Brent Owens to name a few.  He is a Trailblazer on a number of levels.”
 
Lee is an award-winning More

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