Displaying 31 - 40 of 3958
  • Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2020
This March 29, 2018 file photo, shows the logo for social media giant Facebook at the Nasdaq MarketSite in New York's Times Square. Facebook said Monday Jan. 6, 2020 that it is banning “deepfake” videos, the false but realistic clips created with artificial intelligence and sophisticated tools, as it steps up efforts to fight online manipulation. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
LONDON (AP) -- 

Facebook says it is banning "deepfake" videos, the false but realistic clips created with artificial intelligence and sophisticated tools, as it steps up efforts to fight online manipulation. 

The social network said late Monday that it's beefing up its policies to remove videos edited or synthesized in ways that aren't apparent to the average person, and which could dupe someone into thinking the video's subject said something he or she didn't actually say. 

Created by artificial intelligence or machine learning, deepfakes combine or replace content to create images that can be almost impossible to tell are not authentic. 

"While these videos are still rare on the internet, they present a significant challenge for our industry and society as their use increases," Facebook's vice president of global policy management, Monika Bickert, said in a blog post. 

However, she said the new rules won't include parody or satire, or More

  • Monday, Jan. 6, 2020
Los Angeles County District Attorney Jackie Lacey, at podium, announces that film producer Harvey Weinstein has been charged with raping a woman and sexually assaulting another in separate incidents over a two-day period in 2013, at a news conference at the Hall of Justice in Los Angeles, Monday, Jan. 6, 2020. From left, Paul Thompson, Los Angeles County District Deputy Attorney, Lacey, Michel Moore, Chief of the Los Angeles Police Department, and Sandra Spagnoli, Chief of Police, Beverly Hills, Calif. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- 

Los Angeles prosecutors charged Harvey Weinstein on Monday with sexually assaulting two women on successive nights during Oscars week in 2013, bringing the new case against the disgraced Hollywood mogul on the eve of jury selection for his New York trial.

The case, brought by a task force set up by the Los Angeles County district attorney to investigate sex-crime allegations against entertainment figures, now puts Weinstein in deep legal peril on both coasts, where he built a career as the one of the most powerful — and feared — figures in show business before a barrage of accusations from more than 75 women led to his downfall and ignited the #MeToo movement.

Weinstein, 67, was charged with raping a woman at a Los Angeles hotel on Feb. 18, 2013, after pushing his way inside her room, then sexually assaulting a woman in a Beverly Hills hotel suite the next night. He could get up to 28 years in prison on charges of forcible rape, forcible More

  • Sunday, Jan. 5, 2020
Mollye Asher, recipient of the Producers Award
LOS ANGELES -- 

Film Independent announced the winners of its four filmmaker grants at the annual Spirit Awards Nominee Brunch held at BOA Steakhouse in West Hollywood on Saturday (1/4). Director and Project Involve Fellow Jon M. Chu (In the Heights, Crazy Rich Asians) and actor and Spirit Award nominee Alfre Woodard (Clemency) co-hosted the event and handed out the honors. Winners for the remaining categories will be revealed at the 2020 Film Independent Spirit Awards on Saturday, February 8. The Spirit Awards are the primary fundraiser for Film Independent’s year-round programs, which cultivate the careers of emerging filmmakers and promote diversity in the industry. The awards ceremony will be broadcast live exclusively on IFC at 5pm ET/2pm PT.

Kelly Reichardt received the third Bonnie Award, named after Bonnie Tiburzi Caputo who joined American Airlines in 1973 at age 24, becoming the first female pilot to fly for a major U.S. airline. In More

  • Saturday, Jan. 4, 2020
In this Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, file photo, shows the sun rise outside the Egyptian Theatre on Main Street before a morning premiere during the 2019 Sundance Film Festival, in Park City, Utah. Sundance Film Festival officials are trying to increase diversity among media covering the annual event in Park City by paying travel costs for about 50 journalists who are women, LGBTQ, minorities or have disabilities. The program has become so popular nearly 320 people applied this year. (Photo by Danny Moloshok/Invision/AP, File)
SALT LAKE CITY, Utah (AP) -- 

A Sundance Film Festival program designed to increase diversity among media members covering the annual event in Park City boomed in popularity in the initiative's second year. 

For this year's festival, 51 journalists were selected out of a pool of 319 applicants to receive travel stipends provided in the program, The Salt Lake Tribune reports. The chosen writers are women (61%), LGBTQ (49%), minorities (84%) and people with disabilities (25%).

The festival runs Jan. 23-Feb. 2. 

Sundance officials created the Press Inclusion Program in 2018 after a study by USC Annenberg's Inclusion Initiative that two-thirds of movie critics were white men. 

Movie blogger Rendy Jones was among the participants in the inaugural program last year. The 21-year-old black and nonbinary writer from New York called it an "amazing" experience and the highlight of his year. 

"I met so many different people from different fields — industry and More

  • Friday, Jan. 3, 2020
In this Aug. 26, 2019, file photo, Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson speaks at a news conference in Seattle. Washington state sued Johnson & Johnson on Thursday, Jan. 2, 2020, claiming the company was negligent when it used deceptive marketing to say the drugs were effective for treating pain and were unlikely to cause addiction. The lawsuit filed Thursday says the company that supplies raw materials used to make opiates drove the pharmaceutical industry to recklessly expand the production of the drugs. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
SEATTLE (AP) -- 

Washington state sued Johnson & Johnson on Thursday, claiming the company was negligent when it used deceptive marketing to say the drugs were effective for treating pain and were unlikely to cause addiction.

The multinational company that supplies raw materials used to make opiates drove the pharmaceutical industry to recklessly expand the production of opioids to the point where there was more than a two-week supply of daily doses for every person in the state, the lawsuit says.

"The human toll is staggering," state Attorney General Bob Ferguson said at a news conference.

The lawsuit, which seeks civil penalties and damages, was filed in King County Superior Court. It says the company violated the state's Consumer Protection Act, was negligent and a public nuisance. 

Washington is also asking that the company forfeit profits made in the state as a result of its behavior. Ferguson said that figure is in the millions of More

  • Thursday, Jan. 2, 2020
This July 25, 2019 file photo shows Jenji Kohan at the final season premiere of Netflix's "Orange Is the New Black" in New York. Police say the son of well-known television producer Jenji Kohan has died after a ski accident in Utah. Authorities said Thursday that 20-year-old Charlie Noxon was pronounced dead after the accident on an intermediate trail at Park City Mountain resort on New Year's Eve. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP, File)
SALT LAKE CITY, Utah (AP) -- 

The son of television producer Jenji Kohan, who created the series "Orange is the New Black," died in a New Year's Eve ski accident in Utah, police said Thursday. 

Charles "Charlie" Noxon, 20, was pronounced dead after hitting a sign Tuesday on an intermediate-level trail at Park City Mountain resort , police said. 

He was alone and there were no witnesses to the crash, but it appears that it happened as he tried to navigate a fork in the trail, Summit County sheriff's Lt. Andrew Wright said. 

Noxon was quickly discovered by other skiers and pronounced dead by an air ambulance crew before reaching a hospital. He had experience skiing and was wearing a helmet, Wright said. The cause of death is under investigation.

Noxon was on a trip with his siblings and father,  journalist Christopher Noxon, police said. They were further down the mountain at the time of the accident. 

His mother is known for creating the Netflix More

  • Thursday, Jan. 2, 2020
In this Feb. 24, 2019 file photo, Octavia Spencer arrives at the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File)
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- 

Charlize Theron, Octavia Spencer and Daniel Craig are among the first presenters announced for Sunday's Golden Globe Awards.

The Hollywood Foreign Press Association also announced Thursday that other presenters will include Sofia Vergara, Kerry Washington, Tiffany Haddish, Glenn Close and Will Ferrell. Kate McKinnon and Ted Danson will also present. 

Ricky Gervais will host the 77th annual Golden Globes Awards that will air on NBC. It will be the fifth time Gervais emcees the ceremony after hosting the show from 2010 to 2012 and 2016.

Gervais' hosting stints have been marked by relentless skewering of his fellow actors, and the HFPA.

Tom Hanks will receive the Cecil B. DeMille Award, an accolade for film. He is a four-time Golden Globe winner for his acting work on "Big," "Philadelphia" and "Forrest Gump" along with his directing efforts in HBO's 2001 miniseries "Band of Brothers."

Ellen DeGeneres will be honored with More

  • Thursday, Jan. 2, 2020
HFPA President Lorenzo Soria speaks at the nominations for the 77th annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Monday, Dec. 9, 2019, in Beverly Hills, Calif. The 77th annual Golden Globe Awards will be held on Sunday, Jan. 5, 2020. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello)
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- 

The Golden Globes, known as the "party of the year," is going with a meatless menu for its 77th annual awards show.

Guests will be served a 100% plant-based meal just ahead of showtime Sunday. The Hollywood Foreign Press Association said Thursday that it wants the initiative to raise environmental awareness about food consumption and waste.

"If there's a way we can, not change the world, but save the planet, maybe we can get the Golden Globes to send a signal and draw attention to the issue about climate change," HFPA president Lorenzo Soria said. "The food we eat, the way we grow the food we eat, the way we dispose of the food is one of the large contributors to the climate crisis."

The annual awards ceremony will air on NBC and be held at The Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California. 

Soria said there was some initial push back about changing the menu just about two weeks before the show, but the hotel eventually agreed More

  • Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2019
This Nov. 22, 2015 file photo shows Justin Bieber at the American Music Awards in Los Angeles. Bieber is a launching a docu-series about creating his new album on YouTube, the platform the singer originally got his start in music over a decade ago. YouTube announced Tuesday that “Justin Bieber: Seasons” will debut on Jan. 27 and the 10-episode series will follow the pop star while he records his first new album since 2015. (AP Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- 

Justin Bieber is a launching a docu-series about creating his new album on YouTube, the platform where the singer originally got his start in music over a decade ago.

YouTube announced Tuesday that "Justin Bieber: Seasons" will debut Jan. 27. The 10-episode series will follow the pop star while he records his first new album since 2015. Before releasing his debut song in 2009, Bieber gained popularity from posting his performances of cover songs on YouTube.

"When I was getting started, YouTube provided me a platform and a community where I could share music, experiences and moments with my fans," Bieber said in a statement. "It feels great to partner with YouTube for this original documentary series. I want my fans to be part of this journey."

Bieber, 25, will release a new song, "Yummy," on Friday. His most recent album was "Purpose," which features the hits "Sorry," "Love Yourself," "What Do You Mean?" and "Where Are U Now," a More

  • Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2019
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- 

Calling a soft drink "diet" isn't a weight-loss promise, a federal appeals court said Monday.

The Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco refused to reinstate a class-action lawsuit by a woman who argued that the makers of Diet Dr Pepper committed fraud. 

Shana Becerra of Santa Rosa argued that she had been drinking Diet Dr Pepper for more than 13 years and "did not receive what she paid for" because of deceptive advertising, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. 

But when used as an adjective, the dictionary definition of "diet" refers to a product that has fewer calories that the "regular" version of the product, said the ruling by Judge Jay Bybee in a 3-0 appellate panel decision.

"No reasonable consumer would assume that Diet Dr Pepper's use of the term 'diet' promises weight loss or management," Bybee wrote.

In upholding a lower court's dismissal of her suit, the panel also dismissed Becerra's More

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