Displaying 41 - 50 of 4418
  • Wednesday, Sep. 30, 2020
File picture taken on July 4, 1959 shows Italian actress Sophia Loren, American journalist Elsa Maxwell and festival director Dr. Alfred Bauer, right, talk at the festival in the Palais am Funkturm in Berlin. (Konrad Giehr/dpa via AP, file)
BERLIN (AP) -- 

A study has concluded that the founding director of the Berlin International Film Festival made a "not insignificant" contribution to the German film system under Nazi rule and later covered up his role, festival organizers said Wednesday.

Alfred Bauer led the "Berlinale" from 1951 to 1976, building the festival into a major draw for then-West Berlin. It is now one of the major European film festivals, along with Cannes and Venice.

In January, the festival suspended a prize named for Bauer after German newspaper Die Zeit reported that he was a senior figure in the Nazis' moviemaking bureaucracy. It said it hadn't previously been aware of Bauer having held an important position during the Nazi era and commissioned a study from Germany's Leibniz Institute for Contemporary History.

The study's editor concluded that "Alfred Bauer made a not insignificant contribution to the functioning of the German film system during the Nazi More

  • Wednesday, Sep. 30, 2020
In this Monday, Oct. 23, 2006, file photo, actor Sacha Baron Cohen arrives in character as Borat for the film premiere of "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan," in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles. Borat is back. Sacha Baron Cohen has filmed a sequel to his 2006 film “Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan” that Amazon plans to release before the 2020 election. (AP Photo/Matt Sayles, File)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

Borat is back. Sacha Baron Cohen has filmed a sequel to his 2006 film "Borat! Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan" that Amazon plans to release before the election.

The streaming giant confirmed Tuesday that it has acquired worldwide rights to the film. It's reportedly titled: "Borat: Gift of Pornographic Monkey to Vice Premiere Mikhael Pence to Make Benefit Recently Diminished Nation of Kazakhstan."

Reports have steadily accumulated about the project throughout the summer as it was filmed in secret during the pandemic. In early July, Rudy Giuliani called the police on Cohen after an interview in which Cohen emerged in character. Giuliani told Page Six: "This guy comes running in wearing a crazy, what I would say was a pink transgender outfit. It was a pink bikini, with lace."

In June, Cohen appeared at a far-right rally in Olympia, Washington, posing as a sponsor of the event. He led the More

  • Tuesday, Sep. 29, 2020
Barry Jenkins arrives at the 77th annual Golden Globe Awards in Beverly Hills, Calif., on Jan. 5, 2020. The Walt Disney Co. is developing a sequel to the 2019 live-action “The Lion King,” with Jenkins, the director of the Oscar-winning “Moonlight” and the James Baldwin adaptation “If Beale Street Could Talk,” directing. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

The Walt Disney Co. will make a sequel to the 2019 live-action "The Lion King," with Barry Jenkins, the director of the Oscar-winning "Moonlight" and the James Baldwin adaptation "If Beale Street Could Talk," set to direct.

Disney announced plans Tuesday for a follow-up to last year's poorly reviewed but highly popular photorealistic remake. The new "Lion King" grossed more than $1.6 billion worldwide, so a sequel was perhaps always likely. Less expected was a "Lion King" sequel with Jenkins directing.

"Helping my sister raise two young boys during the '90s, I grew up with these characters," Jenkins said in a statement. "Having the opportunity to work with Disney on expanding this magnificent tale of friendship, love and legacy while furthering my work chronicling the lives and souls of folk within the African diaspora is a dream come true." 

Jenkins earlier this year completed shooting on the Amazon limited series "The Underground More

  • Monday, Sep. 28, 2020
In this Sunday, Feb. 9, 2020, file photo, Ava DuVernay arrives at the Vanity Fair Oscar Party, in Beverly Hills, Calif. DuVernay will be honored in October 2020 by MacDowell, which is presenting its inaugural Marian MacDowell Arts Advocacy Award to her media company and arts collective ARRAY. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

Filmmaker Ava DuVernay will be honored next month by MacDowell, which is presenting its inaugural Marian MacDowell Arts Advocacy Award to her media company and arts collective ARRAY.

The award is named for the co-founder of MacDowell, the century-old artist residency in Peterborough, New Hampshire, where James Baldwin, Leonard Bernstein and many others have been visiting fellows. DuVernay, known for such acclaimed movies as "Selma" and "13th," founded ARRAY in 2012 as a way of amplifying the work of women and people of color. 

"I am touched that our narrative change collective ARRAY, which is built upon a mission to articulate and amplify stories from the widest range of art makers, is being honored in Ms. MacDowell's name," DuVernay said in a statement Sunday. "I look forward to cultivating a partnership between ARRAY and MacDowell to enable more artists of color, specifically women, to be a part of the residency program in coming years More

  • Sunday, Sep. 27, 2020
Thomas Pollock
LOS ANGELES -- 

The American Film Institute (AFI) announced the establishment of the Thomas P. Pollock Endowed Scholarship Fund in memory of AFI chair emeritus Thomas Pollock. The fund, established in collaboration with Pollock’s family, is supported by leadership gifts from Mellody Hobson and George Lucas, Robert Daly and Carole Bayer Sager, Kate Capshaw and Steven Spielberg, Jeffrey and Marilyn Katzenberg, Todd Phillips, Alan and Cindy Horn, Kathleen Kennedy and Frank Marshall, the Jeffrey and Margo Baker Barbakow Family, Ivan Reitman, Ron Howard, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alan Hergott, Jon and Barbara Avnet, George and Amal Clooney, Universal Pictures and the Pollock Family – Alexandra and Ryan Gagerman, Allegra and Paul Brandano and Luke Pollock.

“Tom championed AFI and the power of great stories – and he believed in the mission of the Conservatory to inspire and educate diverse voices,” said Kathleen Kennedy, chair of the AFI Board of Trustees. “Through this More

  • Saturday, Sep. 26, 2020
In this photo made from UNTV video, Suga Yoshihide, Prime Minister of Japan, speaks in a pre-recorded message which was played during the 75th session of the United Nations General Assembly, Friday, Sept. 25, 2020, at UN Headquarters. (UNTV Via AP )
TOKYO (AP) -- 

Japan's new prime minister said Saturday that he's determined to host the Tokyo Olympic Games next summer as "proof that humanity has defeated the pandemic." 

The 2020 Games were postponed as the coronavirus spread worldwide, and there's been widespread doubt about their future. 

Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga said in a prerecorded speech at the U.N. General Assembly that he will "spare no effort in order to welcome you to Games that are safe and secure." 

Surveys have shown that a majority of Japanese companies and the public don't think the Olympics will, or should, happen next year. A poll published in June by Japanese broadcaster NHK said two-thirds of sponsors were undecided about extending for another year.

Keeping domestic sponsors on board is financially critical, and Japanese leaders have been eager to signal the Games' viability next year. 

Recruited by Japanese advertising agency Dentsu Inc., domestic More

  • Saturday, Sep. 26, 2020
In this July 25, 2017, file photo, Alphabet stock is shown on a screen at the Nasdaq MarketSite in New York. Google's parent company has reached a $310 million settlement, Friday, Sept. 25, 2020, in a shareholder lawsuit over its treatment of allegations of sexual misconduct by executives. Thousands of Google employees walked out of work in protest in 2018 after The New York Times revealed Android creator Andy Rubin received $90 million in severance even though several employees filed misconduct allegations against him. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

Google's parent company has reached a $310 million settlement in a shareholder lawsuit over its treatment of allegations of executives' sexual misconduct.

Alphabet Inc. said Friday that it will prohibit severance packages for anyone fired for misconduct or is the subject of a sexual misconduct investigation. A special team will investigate any allegations against executives and report to the board's audit committee. 

Thousands of Google employees walked out of work in protest in 2018 after The New York Times revealed Android creator Andy Rubin received $90 million in severance even though several employees had filed misconduct allegations against him. Shareholder lawsuits followed, and in 2019 Google launched a board investigation over how it handles sexual misconduct allegations.

In January, David Drummond, the Alphabet's legal chief, left without an exit package, following accusations of inappropriate relationships with employees More

  • Friday, Sep. 25, 2020
This April 25, 2019, file photo shows the thumbs-up "Like" logo on a sign at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. A group of prominent Facebook critics, including one of the social network's early investors and a journalist facing jail time in the Philippines, are launching their version of an “oversight board” to rival the company's own. The announcement Friday, Sept. 25, 2020 comes a day after Facebook said its own, quasi-independent oversight board, which has faced numerous delays since the company announced its creation in 2018, will launch in October. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) -- 

A group of prominent Facebook critics, including one of the social network's early investors and a journalist facing jail time in the Philippines, are launching their version of an "oversight board" to rival the company's own.

The group says Facebook is taking too long to set up its oversight panel, which they argue is too limited in its scope and autonomy. 

The critics, who include early investor Roger McNamee, Filipino journalist Maria Ressa and Shoshana Zuboff, author of "Surveillance Capitalism," are warning that Facebook is already being used to undermine the integrity of the U.S. presidential election and are calling for "proper independent scrutiny" of the company. 

The group, however, has no authority over Facebook and it is not an actual "board." Rather, the group says it was started to sound the alarm about Facebook's role in the coming election.

The announcement Friday comes a day after Facebook said its own, quasi More

  • Friday, Sep. 25, 2020
Icons for the smartphone apps TikTok and WeChat are seen on a smartphone screen in Beijing, in a Friday, Aug. 7, 2020 file photo. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

The Justice Department is seeking an immediate ban on downloads of WeChat in Apple and Google app stores, saying the Chinese-owned messaging service is a threat to the security of the United States. 

Last week the U.S. Commerce Department moved to ban WeChat from U.S. app stores but on Saturday, Magistrate Judge Laurel Beeler in California agreed to delay U.S. restrictions, saying they would affect users' First Amendment rights. 

In a filing Friday, the Justice Department asked Beeler to allow for an immediate ban while the case works its way through court. 

WeChat is a messaging-focused app popular with many Chinese-speaking Americans that serves as a lifeline to friends, family, customers and business contacts in China. It's owned by Chinese tech giant Tencent. 

The Justice Department says WeChat allows the Chinese government to collect and use personal data on Americans to advance its own interests. The filing states More

  • Thursday, Sep. 24, 2020
In this April 14, 2020 file photo, the thumbs up Like logo is shown on a sign at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. Facebook's long-awaited oversight board that will act as a referee on whether specific content is allowed on the tech giant's platforms is set to launch in October, 2020. CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced two years ago that he was setting up the quasi-independent board in response to criticism that the company wasn't moving fast enough to remove misinformation, hate speech and malign influence campaigns. The board is intended to rule on thorny content issues, such as when Facebook or Instagram posts constitute hate speech. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
LONDON (AP) -- 

Facebook's long-awaited oversight board that will act as a referee on whether specific content is allowed on the tech giant's platforms is set to launch in October.

CEO Mark Zuckerberg said two years ago that he was setting up the quasi-independent board, following intense criticism that the company wasn't moving fast enough to remove misinformation, hate speech and malign influence campaigns. The board  is intended to rule on thorny content issues, such as when Facebook or Instagram posts constitute hate speech. 

"We are currently testing the newly deployed technical systems that will allow users to appeal and the Board to review cases," it said in a statement Thursday. 

If those tests go to plan, the board said it would start accepting and reviewing appeals from users in mid to late October. 

The board was initially expected to start operating in early 2020 but the launch was delayed. 

"Building a process that is More

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