Displaying 61 - 70 of 5095
  • Monday, Sep. 20, 2021
This July 9, 2015, file photo, shows signage outside Procter & Gamble corporate headquarters in downtown Cincinnati, USA. Computer-maker HP, consumer goods giant Procter & Gamble and coffee capsule company Nespresso have joined a corporate pledge to sharply cut their greenhouse gas emissions over the coming 20 years.The Climate Pledge, a grouping of companies and organizations spearheaded by Amazon, said Monday that it has signed up 86 new members for its voluntary measures. In total they now have 201 members with global annual revenues of more than $1.8 trillion. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
BERLIN (AP) -- 

Computer-maker HP, consumer goods business Procter & Gamble and coffee capsule company Nespresso have joined a corporate pledge to sharply cut their greenhouse gas emissions over nearly two decades.

The Climate Pledge, a grouping of companies and organizations spearheaded by Amazon, said Monday that it has signed up 86 new members for its voluntary measures. In total, the group now has 201 members with global annual revenues of more than $1.8 trillion, it said.

Other new members include telecoms company BT, truck-maker Scania and the Selfridges department store chain.

Together, the companies aim to cut almost 2 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide by 2040 — more than 5% of the current global total.

While the group's members are encouraged to eliminate as many emissions as possible, those that can't be avoided need to be completely offset in the next two decades. That means paying for measures to ensure as many emissions More

  • Monday, Sep. 20, 2021
ANA CEO Bob Liodice
NEW YORK -- 

White, non-Hispanic executives feel more included in their companies’ business decision-making process than ethnic minority managers, according to a new study by the ANA Educational Foundation (AEF).

The study, “My Voice Matters: Linking Inclusion to Business Growth,” investigated levels of inclusion when making business decisions, determining career progression and growth, and evaluating a sense of belonging within the industry. The report queried respondents in three key areas linked to business performance: My Voice in the Room, My Voice in the Company, and My Voice in the Industry.

In terms of race and ethnicity, survey respondents were divided into two groups: White Non-Hispanic and Ethnic Minority. Across all dimensions, Ethnic Minority respondents indicated they did not feel included in the corporate decision-making process as much as their White Non-Hispanic counterparts. In many instances, the gap was statistically significant. More

  • Friday, Sep. 17, 2021
This combination of photos from the series "The Circus," shows John Heilemann during an interview at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles on January 27, 2021, left, and Jennifer Palmieri during an interview in New York on Feb. 12, 2021. Showtime's political series ‘The Circus’ returns on Sunday. (Showtime via AP)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

What does "The Circus" do when the circus has left town?

That's the pithy question that comes to mind upon learning that the Showtime political series opens its seventh season on Sunday, when consumer interest in political news has dropped sharply with the end of Donald Trump's presidency.

"The thing about the circus — there's comedy, there's drama and there are death-defying acts of physical daring," said John Heilemann, one of the show's four reporters. "Those things are still in our politics and we think the drama of American politics is ever-present, has not receded in any way and is just as compelling."

There was no thought given to ending "The Circus" just because one big story had changed, he said.

Heilemann, along with Mark McKinnon, Jennifer Palmieri and Alex Wagner, guide viewers through the three rings each week, explaining the nuances and meaning of political stories. Heilemann spent time in California this week More

  • Thursday, Sep. 16, 2021
In this March 29, 2018, file photo, the logo for Facebook appears on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite in New York's Times Square. Facebook removed almost 150 accounts and pages linked to anti-lockdown demonstrators in Germany, the company announced Thursday, Sept. 16, 2021 under a new policy focused on groups that spread misinformation or incite violence but who don't fit into the platform's existing categories of bad actors. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

Facebook removed almost 150 accounts and pages linked to anti-lockdown demonstrators in Germany, the company announced Thursday, under a new policy focused on groups that spread misinformation or incite violence but who don't fit into the platform's existing categories of bad actors.

The accounts on Facebook and Instagram spread content linked to the so-called Querdenken movement, a disparate group that has protested lockdown measures in Germany and includes vaccine and mask opponents, conspiracy theorists and some far-right extremists.

Posts from the accounts included one making the debunked claim that vaccines create viral variants and another that wished death upon police officers who broke up violent anti-lockdown protests in Berlin.

The action is the first under Facebook's new policy focused on preventing "coordinated social harm," which company officials said is an attempt to address content from social media users who work More

  • Thursday, Sep. 16, 2021
In this July 1986 file photo, Actress Jane Powell poses for a photo in New York. Jane Powell, the bright-eyed, operatic-voiced star of Hollywood's golden age musicals who sang with Howard Keel in “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers” and danced with Fred Astaire in “Royal Wedding,” has died. Thursday, Sept. 16, 2021. She was 92. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- 

Jane Powell, the bright-eyed, operatic-voiced star of Hollywood's golden age musicals who sang with Howard Keel in "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" and danced with Fred Astaire in "Royal Wedding," has died. She was 92.

Powell died Thursday at her Wilton, Connecticut, home, longtime friend Susan Grander said. Granger said Powell died of natural causes.

Powell performed virtually her whole life, starting about age 5 as a singing prodigy on radio in Portland, Oregon. She made her first movie at 16 and graduated from teenage roles to costarring in the lavish musical productions there were a 20th-century Hollywood staple.

Her 1950 casting in "Royal Wedding" came by default. June Allyson was first announced as Astaire's co-star but withdrew when she became pregnant. Judy Garland was cast, but was withdrawn because of personal problems. Jane Powell was next in line.

"They had to give it to me," she quipped at the time. "Everybody More

  • Thursday, Sep. 16, 2021
Ken Jennings appears at the 2020 ABC Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour in Pasadena, Calif., on Jan. 8, 2020, left, and actress Mayim Bialik appears at the 23rd annual Critics' Choice Awards in Santa Monica, Calif., on Jan. 11, 2018. Jennings and Bialik will split “Jeopardy!” hosting duties for the remainder of the game show’s 38th season. (AP Photo)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

Mayim Bialik and Ken Jennings will split "Jeopardy!" hosting duties for the remainder of the game show's 38th season.

Sony Pictures Television announced the host plan Thursday, the same week that episodes filmed by ousted host Mike Richards are airing. 

Richards, who also lost his role as "Jeopardy!" executive producer, was  initially tapped as Alex Trebek's successor but left the show after past misogynistic and disparaging comments surfaced.

Bialik was tapped as interim host, and her episodes will air through Nov. 5. After that, Sony says Jennings and Bialik will share hosting duties based on their schedules. The season is scheduled to run through the end of the year.

Jennings, the record-holder for longest "Jeopardy!" winning streak, is a consulting producer on the show. Bialik has already been chosen to host "Jeopardy!" prime-time and spinoff series, including a new college championship.

"Jeopardy!" used a series More

  • Thursday, Sep. 16, 2021
Will Smith (l-r) as Richard Williams, Demi Singleton as Serena Williams and Saniyya Sidney as Venus Williams in a scene from “King Richard.” (photo courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures)
LOS ANGELES -- 

The American Film Institute (AFI) announced that AFI Fest 2021 will close with Warner Bros. Pictures’ King Richard, directed by Reinaldo Marcus Green with cinematography by Robert Elswit (AFI Class of 1977) and starring two-time Academy Award® nominee Will Smith. Written by Zach Baylin and produced by Tim White and Trevor White’s Star Thrower Entertainment and Smith’s own banner, Westbrook, the film follows Richard Williams, an undeterred father who, with the support of his family, is instrumental in raising two of the most extraordinarily gifted athletes of all time, tennis champions Venus and Serena Williams. The closing night screening will take place on Sunday, November 14 at the historic TCL Chinese Theatre.

“AFI’s mission includes inspiring audiences, and King Richard sets the bar for this year,” said Sarah Harris, director of programming at AFI Festivals. “Movies often deliver when we need them most, and now is the More

  • Wednesday, Sep. 15, 2021
Cedric the Entertainer performs during "Stand Up for Haiti" comedy fundraiser in Los Angeles on Aug. 30, 2021. The comedian and actor will host Sunday’s Emmy ceremony, airing on CBS. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP, File)
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- 

As busy as Cedric the Entertainer is with his sitcom "The Neighborhood" and other projects, he quickly said yes when asked to host his first major awards show.

Then he sought advice on how to handle Sunday's Emmy ceremony, airing on CBS (8 p.m. EDT).

"Steve Harvey, my good friend who's hosted a lot of these 'big nights,' he had some great tidbits for me," said the actor-comedian. Others on his call list for trade secrets: Billy Crystal, Anthony Anderson and Chris Rock, all veterans at emceeing Hollywood bashes.

"And if you have a line on Tina Fey, I don't have her number, but I would love to talk to her," Cedric said.

He was already aware of one modern pitfall of hosting: Offensive old jokes, like the ones on Twitter that cost Kevin Hart the Oscar emcee gig in 2018.

"Just try not to get canceled beforehand, that's the biggest thing," Cedric said, tongue firmly in cheek. It's the kind of puckish observation that a man More

  • Tuesday, Sep. 14, 2021
Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Tom Brady (12) fires a pass against the Dallas Cowboys during the first half of an NFL football game Thursday, Sept. 9, 2021, in Tampa, Fla. (AP Photo/Scott Audette)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

The ageless Tom Brady is due a thank you note from NBC.

The Tampa Bay Bucs quarterback helped the network to a smashing audience of 24.8 million viewers for the NFL kickoff game, where he took on and defeated the Dallas Cowboys. That's up from last year's season opener, which reached 19.3 million.

It was a less attractive matchup for the season debut of "Sunday Night Football," where the Chicago Bears and L.A. Rams were seen by 17.6 million. That's down from the 2020 season debut of the Sunday night franchise, seen by 18.9 million.

Two primetime football games led NBC to a weekly ratings win, as it averaged 7.8 million viewers. CBS had 3.5 million viewers in prime time, ABC had 3 million, Fox had 2.4 million, Univision had 1.4 million, Ion Television had 1.12 million and Telemundo had 1.06 million.

Fox News Channel led the cable networks in primetime, averaging 2.23 million viewers. ESPN had 1.89 million, HGTV had 1.07 More

  • Tuesday, Sep. 14, 2021
Alanis Morissette attends the "Jagged Little Pill" Broadway opening night in New York on Dec. 5, 2019. Just hours before the HBO documentary “Jagged” was to premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival on Tuesday, Alanis Morissette criticized the film about her life as “reductive” and “salacious.” Morissette participated in the film, directed by Alison Klayman, sitting for lengthy interviews. But in a statement issued by her publicist, Morissette said she would not be supporting the film. (Photo by Greg Allen/Invision/AP, File)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

Just hours before the HBO documentary "Jagged"  was to premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival on Tuesday, Alanis Morissette criticized the film about her life as "reductive" and "salacious." 

Morissette participated in the film, directed by Alison Klayman, sitting for lengthy interviews. But in a statement issued by her publicist, the Canadian musician said she would not be supporting the film, named after her breakthrough 1995 album, "Jagged Little Pill." 

"I agreed to participate in a piece about the celebration of 'Jagged Little Pill''s 25th anniversary, and was interviewed during a very vulnerable time (while in the midst of my third postpartum depression during lockdown)," wrote Morissette. "I was lulled into a false sense of security and their salacious agenda became apparent immediately upon my seeing the first cut of the film. This is when I knew our visions were in fact painfully diverged. This was not the story I More

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