Tuesday, April 23, 2019

News Briefs

Displaying 101 - 110 of 3530
  • Monday, Feb. 18, 2019
Lisa Borders steps down as head of Time's Up organization
In this Sept. 7, 2018, file photo, then WNBA president Lisa Borders addresses media members before Game 1 of the WNBA basketball finals between the Seattle Storm and the Washington Mystics in Seattle. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- 

Lisa Borders says she has resigned as president and CEO of Time's Up, the gender equality initiative formed last year in response to sexual misconduct allegations in Hollywood.

Borders says in statement Monday that she is stepping aside "with deep regret" due to family issues. She didn't elaborate.

Chief Operating Officer Rebecca Goldman will serve as interim CEO while the organization conducts an executive search.

Borders, former president of the WNBA, was named head of Time's Up last year.

The organization was formed in January 2018 in response to sexual misconduct allegations leveled against powerful men in the entertainment industry including Harvey Weinstein and Kevin Spacey.

  • Monday, Feb. 18, 2019
Julia Roberts to receive George Eastman Award for movie work
This image released by Amazon shows Julia Roberts in a scene from "Homecoming," an Amazon series premiering on Nov. 2. (Hilary B Gayle/Amazon via AP)
ROCHESTER, N.Y. (AP) -- 

Actress Julia Roberts will be this year's recipient of the George Eastman Award, given to honor contributions to the art of cinema.

The George Eastman Museum in Rochester says it will honor the "Pretty Woman" and "Steel Magnolias" actress on May 2.

Past recipients include Lauren Bacall, Charlie Chaplin, Gary Cooper and Meryl Streep.

Museum director Bruce Barnes cites the breadth of Roberts' career and roles over the past 30 years. She has earned a best actress Academy Award and three Golden Globes, along with more than a dozen other nominations.

The museum says it established the George Eastman Award in 1955 as the first retrospective award to honor film work of enduring artistic value.

Tickets for the May ceremony go on sale March 18.

 

  • Monday, Feb. 18, 2019
U.K. lawmakers slam Facebook, recommend stiffer regulation
In this May 18, 2012, file photo a television photographer shoots the sign outside of Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. A parliamentary committee report published Sunday, Feb. 17, 2019, has recommended that the United Kingdom government increase oversight of social media platforms like Facebook to better control harmful or illegal content. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

British lawmakers issued a scathing report Monday that accused Facebook of intentionally violating privacy and anti-competition laws in the U.K., and called for greater oversight of social media companies.

The report on fake news and disinformation on social media sites followed an 18-month investigation. The parliamentary committee that prepared the report says social media sites should have to follow a mandatory code of ethics overseen by an independent regulator to better control harmful or illegal content.

The report called out Facebook in particular, saying that the site's structure seems to be designed to "conceal knowledge of and responsibility for specific decisions."

"It is evident that Facebook intentionally and knowingly violated both data privacy and anti-competition laws," the report states. It also accuses CEO Mark Zuckerberg of showing contempt for the U.K. Parliament by declining numerous invitations to appear before the committee.

Facebook did not immediately respond to an email request for comment.

Facebook and other internet companies have been facing increased scrutiny over how they handle user data and have come under fire for not doing enough to stop misuse of their platforms by groups trying to sway elections.

The report by the Parliament's media committee echoes and expands upon an interim report with similar findings issued by the committee in July . And in December , a trove of documents released by the committee offered evidence that the social network had used its enormous trove of user data as a competitive weapon, often in ways designed to keep its users in the dark.

Facebook faced its biggest privacy scandal last year when Cambridge Analytica, a now-defunct British political data-mining firm that worked for the 2016 Donald Trump campaign, accessed the private information of up to 87 million users.

  • Saturday, Feb. 16, 2019
Swiss actor Bruno Ganz, star of "Downfall," dies at 77
In this Monday, Feb. 13, 2017, file photo, Actor Bruno Ganz attends a press conference for the film 'The Party' at the 2017 Berlinale Film Festival in Berlin, Germany. Monday, Feb. 13, 2017. Bruno Ganz has died at 77. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber, file)
BERLIN (AP) -- 

Swiss actor Bruno Ganz, who played Adolf Hitler cooped up in his Berlin bunker in "Downfall" and an angel in Wim Wenders' "Wings of Desire," has died. He was 77.

German news agency dpa reported that Ganz's management said Saturday he died in Zurich.

Ganz, a prominent figure in the German-language theater world, shifted into movies in the 1970s, appearing in Werner Herzog's "Nosferatu" and Wenders' "The American Friend" among others. In one of his more recent appearances, he starred as Sigmund Freund in "The Tobacconist," released last year.

Berlin Mayor Michael Mueller said Ganz was "one of the greats" of the screen and stage. He said that "the death of Bruno Ganz is a great loss for the German-speaking theater and film world."

  • Friday, Feb. 15, 2019
Avnet, Holland named co-chairs of DGA Negotiations Committee
Jon Avnet (l) and Todd Holland
LOS ANGELES -- 

Directors Jon Avnet and Todd Holland have been appointed co-chairs of the next Directors Guild of America (DGA) Feature Film and Television Negotiations Committee. The DGA National Board approved the appointments at its board meeting on Sunday, February 3.

“As an important part of our preparation for the next round of negotiations, we have asked two of our experienced feature and television standard-bearers to lead our negotiations and serve as co-chairs,” said DGA president Thomas Schlamme. “Jon and Todd have accepted, and are eager to take on the next chapter of their considerable Guild service. We are fortunate to have the benefit of their experience, industry know-how and negotiating acumen.”

Avnet said, “We don’t yet know when we’ll begin our negotiations, but we’re preparing well in advance as we always do--through extensive research and engaging with our members and staff to determine key priorities. We will be ready when the time is right.”

Holland added, “We are focused on our core mission: the protection and advancement of the creative and economic rights of our members. Working alongside our Negotiations Committee members, our Creative Rights Committee, and the Guild’s professional staff--we’ll be ready to ensure the best outcome for our members.”

The DGA’s current three-year contract with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers (AMPTP) expires on June 30, 2020.

Avnet has served on the DGA Negotiating Committee for the past three negotiations cycles. He is a National Board alternate, first elected in 2013, and has also served on the Western Directors Council as a member or alternate member since that time. Avnet is a trustee to the DGA Pension and Health Plans and a member of the Finance Committee. A veteran film and television director, Avnet is a two-time DGA Award nominee in the Movies For Television/Limited Series category.

Holland has served on the DGA Negotiating Committee for the past six negotiations cycles. He was first elected to the National Board as an alternate in 2009, and has served as a member or alternate member on the Western Directors Council for nearly two decades. He is also co-chair of the Diversity Task Force, a trustee to the DGA Pension and Health Plans, and second vice chair of the Directors Guild Foundation. Holland is a prolific television director. He won the DGA Award in the Television Comedy category in 2001, and is a six-time nominee. 

The Guild expects to appoint its full Negotiations Committees, made up of directors, assistant directors, unit production managers, associate directors and stage managers working in all genres, later this year. National executive Russell Hollander will serve as the Guild’s chief professional negotiator.

  • Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2019
Zhang Yimou's "One Second" dropped from Berlin film festival
In this Saturday, Nov. 17, 2018, file photo, Chinese director Zhang Yimou holds his award for Best Director at the 55th Golden Horse Awards in Taipei, Taiwan. The latest film from Zhang has been dropped from the Berlin International Film Festival for "technical reasons." A notice on the official account of the movie "One Second" on China's Weibo microblogging service apologized, but gave no details other than to say it was not possible to show the film at Berlin. (AP Photo/Billy Dai, File)
BEIJING (AP) -- 

The latest film from famed Chinese director Zhang Yimou has been dropped from the Berlin film festival for what the festival described as technical reasons.

A notice on the official Weibo microblogging service account for the movie "One Second" apologized but gave no details other than to say it was not possible to show the film at Berlin.

The festival said the film was pulled because of "technical difficulties encountered during post-production." It said the movie would be replaced at its scheduled Friday and Saturday showings with Zhang's action epic "Hero," which premiered in 2002 at the Great Hall of the People, the seat of China's legislature in the heart of Beijing.

Possibly China's best-known filmmaker, Zhang has oscillated between big-budget extravaganzas favored by the ruling Communist Party and edgier fare touching on sensitive political and social topics. His well-known releases include "Shadow," ''House of Flying Daggers," and "Raise the Red Lantern."

"One Second" is set amid the chaos and violence unleashed by Mao Zedong during the 1966-76 Cultural Revolution, a period rarely discussed in history books or portrayed on film. It's slated for release in China next year.

The party is hyper-sensitive to all direct or implied criticism and its control over the arts includes deciding what films are released based on largely secret criteria. Regulators routinely order what can and can't be shown, with special scrutiny for content pertaining to sex, criminal activity, social dislocation, and perceived questioning of the authority or reputation of the party.

Another Chinese film had also been pulled for Berlin for similar reasons. "Better Days," which portrays alienated youth was "withdrawn for censorship reasons," the trade magazine Variety reported, citing unidentified sources.

  • Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019
Watergate in full: Epic documentary shows at Berlin festival
Director Charles Ferguson poses for a photo prior to an interview with the Associated Press about his movie 'Watergate" at the 2019 Berlinale Film Festival in Berlin, Germany, Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
BERLIN (AP) -- 

Director Charles Ferguson thought Watergate had never "properly been done." The result is a documentary that explores the American presidential scandal in its full epic span and clocks in at more than four hours.

Ferguson, who directed the Oscar-winning financial crisis documentary "Inside Job," is presenting the film this week at the Berlin International Film Festival.

Titled "Watergate — Or: How We Learned to Stop an Out of Control President," it features extensive interviews with surviving players of the 1970s scandal and material from the tapes made by President Richard Nixon.

Ferguson told The Associated Press on Tuesday that while many books have been written and films made about Watergate, "there's never been one place where the entire story was told in a comprehensive way."

  • Monday, Feb. 11, 2019
Film academy reveals which 4 Oscars will be given off air
In this Feb. 4, 2019 file photo, an Oscar statue appears at the 91st Academy Awards Nominees Luncheon in Beverly Hills, Calif. (Photo by Danny Moloshok/Invision/AP, File)
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- 

The film academy has finally revealed the Oscar categories that will be presented during the commercial breaks of this year's broadcast.

A spokesperson for the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences said Monday that the awards for cinematography, film editing, makeup and hairstyling, and live-action short will be presented off-air.

The winning speeches will air later in the broadcast and will also be live-streamed on Oscar.com and the film academy's social accounts.

The plan to hand out certain awards during commercials to achieve a three-hour runtime was announced in August. In future years, four to six rotating categories could be cut from the broadcast.

The 91st Oscars will air on ABC on Feb. 24.

  • Monday, Feb. 11, 2019
Clooney returns to high school read "Catch 22" for Hulu show
George Clooney participates in the "Catch-22" panel during the Hulu presentation at the Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour at The Langham Huntington on Monday, Feb. 11, 2019, in Pasadena, Calif. (Photo by Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP)
PASADENA, Calif. (AP) -- 

George Clooney says he never expected his next project to be a miniseries based on a novel he read in high school.

But against his initial inclination, he's directing and starring in Hulu's series "Catch-22," drawn from Joseph Heller's classic work about the insanity of war. The streaming service Hulu will release it this spring.

Clooney said Monday that the longer format allowed them to develop the characters beyond what could be done in Mike Nichols' 1970 classic movie. Adopted at the time by opponents of the Vietnam War, he said the story making fun of the red tape and bureaucracy of war is relevant today and not tied to a particular conflict.

Series makers say the mixture of horror and hilarity becomes more pronounced as the series goes on.

  • Monday, Feb. 11, 2019
Hulu making Howard the Duck and 4 more Marvel animated shows
Craig Erwich, Hulu's SVP of content, speaks at the executive session during the Hulu presentation at the Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour at The Langham Huntington on Monday, Feb. 11, 2019, in Pasadena, Calif. (Photo by Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP)
PASADENA, Calif. (AP) -- 

Hulu is teaming with Marvel to make four separate animated series based on comic book characters like Howard the Duck.

Director Kevin Smith and comics Chelsea Handler and Patton Oswalt are among the people who have signed deals with the streaming service to help produce the cartoons. Smith will work on the Howard the Duck series.

Other shows revolve around M.O.D.O.K., a villain with an enormous head; Hit-Monkey, about a Japanese snow monkey turned assassin; and Tigra and Dazzler, two superheroes who work in Los Angeles.

Hulu senior vice president Craig Erwich said Monday that animation is a particular favorite for its users. Since the deal was just signed, there's no estimate on when the series will be ready.

MySHOOT Profiles

John Komnenich
Director, Editor
Daniel Azarian Photo
Director, Editor
David Orr
Director

MySHOOT Company Profiles