Displaying 141 - 150 of 4142
  • Thursday, Feb. 20, 2020
In this Jan. 27, 1986, file photo, the crew for the Space Shuttle Challenger flight 51-L leaves their quarters for the launch pad at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Mission Spl. Ronald McNair, center, was only the second African American chosen to go to space. He died in the Challenger launch. The documentary "Black in Space: Breaking the Color Barrier" is scheduled to air on the Smithsonian Channel on Monday, Feb. 24, 2020, and examines the race to get black astronauts into space. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)
ALBUQUERQUE, NM (AP) -- 

In 1959, Ronald Erwin McNair walked into a South Carolina library. The 9-year-old aspiring astronaut wanted to check out a calculus book, but a librarian threatened to call the police if he didn't leave. McNair was black.

Years later, McNair was selected to become only the second African American to travel to space, overcoming segregation, poverty, and stereotypes in an intellectual act of resistance that inspired a generation. Tragically, McNair died in the 1986 Space Shuttle Challenger tragedy.

McNair's story and those of other black astronauts are shared in a new documentary that looks at the final frontier of civil rights: getting black astronauts into space amid Jim Crow, danger, discrimination and the Cold War. Within four generations, they went from slavery to space.

"Black in Space: Breaking the Color Barrier," scheduled to air Monday on the Smithsonian Channel, examines the race to get black astronauts into the heavens More

  • Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2020
In this Tuesday, June 4, 2019, file photo, Jennifer Lawrence arrives at the Los Angeles premiere of "Dark Phoenix." Lawrence will star in the Adam McKay comedy “Don't Look Up” for Netflix. The streaming giant on Wednesday announced that it acquired the the project. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

Jennifer Lawrence will star in the Adam McKay comedy "Don't Look Up" for Netflix. 

The streaming giant on Wednesday announced that it acquired the the project. McKay, who wrote the script, will direct the film about two low-level astronomers who go on a media tour to warn of an approaching asteroid heading for Earth. 

Lawrence has been little seen on the big screen lately, most recently co-starring in last year's "X-Men: Dark Phoenix." The 29-year-old actress took a roughly two-year hiatus from acting but has recently returned to work. She recently wrapped production on an untitled film for A24 directed by Lila Neugebauer. 

"I'm so thrilled to make this movie with Jen Lawrence," McKay said in a statement. "She's what folks in the 17th century used to call 'a dynamite act.' And the fact that Netflix sees this movie as a worldwide comedy sets the bar high for me and my team in an exciting and motivating way."

McKay's most More

  • Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2020
This undated image provided by Burger King shows an advertising campaign image with the Whopper hamburger. The burger chain is showing its Whopper covered in mold in print and TV ads running in Europe and the U.S. The message: Burger King is removing artificial preservatives from the Whopper. (Burger King via AP)

Burger King is breaking the mold in its new advertising campaign.

The burger chain is portraying its Whopper covered in mold in print and TV ads running in Europe and the U.S. The message: Burger King is removing artificial preservatives from its signature burger.

The company, already known for irreverent ad campaigns, turned it up a notch, including a time-lapse of a decaying burger on Twitter. That imagery goes beyond the print ads that show a 28-day-old burger — a week beyond. 

Early reaction to the campaign Wednesday was a mix of applause for the shift away from preservatives, to disgust.

The restaurant, based in Miami, Florida, says it has removed artificial preservatives from the Whopper in several European countries — including France, Sweden and Spain — and around 400 of its 7,346 U.S. restaurants. It plans to remove preservatives from Whoppers served in all of its restaurants this year. 

The Whopper is topped More

  • Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2020
Megan St. John
CHICAGO -- 

Third Wheel, a Chicago-based video production company, has rebranded under the name Hike Creative. Video production is still the main focus of the company, started in 2012 by Chicago producer Megan St. John, but with the new name comes a honed-in mission and new brand voice. 

As a full-service production company offering services from pre-production through post, the Third Wheel portfolio spanned commercial work as well as narrative films and web series, but Hike will focus solely on the commercial corner of the industry, specifically web content, branded films, and social campaigns.  Over the last two years the company has also partnered with various agencies to provide production support and crew for shoots. Under the new moniker, Hike will continue to develop relationships with direct clients and aims to be a resource for agencies who are looking for a team to help bring their creative to life.

The company’s new brand voice promotes More

  • Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2020
Eugene Hernandez
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

Eugene Hernandez will succeed Kent Jones as the director of the New York Film Festival, becoming only the fifth person to lead the esteemed Lincoln Center showcase for cinema in its 57-year history. 

Lesli Klainberg, executive director of Film at Lincoln Center, announced the appointment Wednesday, naming Hernandez to the top position at arguably the most revered film festival in the country. Hernandez will oversee the New York Film Festival, along with Dennis Lim, the festival's new director of programming. Lim already presides over year-round programming for Film at Lincoln Center. 

Hernandez, who co-founded IndieWire, was first plucked away from the influential independent film website in 2010, when he joined Film at Lincoln Center as director of digital strategy. For the last six years, he's served as deputy director. Now, Hernandez will take the reins of the prestigious film festival he first attended as a 20-something moviegoer in More

  • Sunday, Feb. 16, 2020
South Korean director Bong Joon Ho gestures upon his arrival at the Incheon International Airport in Incheon, South Korea, Sunday, Feb. 16, 2020. South Koreans are reveling in writer-director Bong's dark comic thriller, "Parasite," which won this year's Academy Awards for best film and best international feature. The movie itself, however, doesn't put the country in a particularly positive light. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
INCHEON, South Korea (AP) -- 

Director Bong Joon Ho smiled and waved at a waiting crowd on Sunday as he arrived home in South Korea, his first trip back since he won four Oscars for his movie "Parasite," including the award for Best Picture.

The crowd clapped and cheered as Bong walked out of the arrivals gate at Incheon International Airport. 

"It's been a long journey in the United States and I'm pleased that it got wrapped up nicely," Bong said, speaking in Korean. "Now, I am happy that I can quietly return to creating, which is my main occupation."

He also joked that he would wash his hands to join the movement to defeat a new virus that has sickened tens of thousands, mostly in China. 

"I'll diligently wash my hands from now on and participate in this movement to defeat coronavirus," he said. As of Sunday, South Korea had 29 confirmed cases of the new virus, which the World Health Organization has named COVID-19, referring to its origin late last More

  • Friday, Feb. 14, 2020
In this May 2, 2018 file photo, director Roman Polanski appears at an international film festival, where he promoted his latest film, "Based on a True Story," in Krakow, Poland. The entire leadership of the Cesar Awards, France's version of the Oscars, stepped down Thursday Feb. 13, 2020, in a spat over both its opaque decision-making process and controversial director Roman Polanski, whose new film, “An Officer and a Spy,” leads this year's nominations. (AP Photo, file)
PARIS (AP) -- 

The entire leadership of the Cesar Awards, France's version of the Oscars, has stepped down in a spat over both its opaque decision-making process and controversial director Roman Polanski, whose new film leads this year's nominations.

The decision by the academy's influential board to resign en masse came Thursday evening, just two weeks before the glitzy 2020 award ceremony.

Multiple nominations for Polanski's "An Officer and a Spy" triggered calls by feminist groups for a boycott of the awards as an expression of outrage against the ceremony and the director. He was accused of sexual assault by a French woman just three months ago, allegations he denies. 

Nominating Polanski's movie in 12 categories this year represented a last straw for the already-roiled academy board, who had expressed frustration over the closed nature of the age-old award's decision-making structure.

"To honor the men and women who made cinema happen More

  • Thursday, Feb. 13, 2020
Eric Belcher
BURBANK, Calif. -- 

Cast & Crew, which provides payroll and human resources, accounting and financial, and workflow and productivity software and services to the entertainment industry, has signed a definitive agreement to purchase Media Services, a payroll and production management solutions company servicing film, television, digital streaming and commercials. This transaction--terms of which were not disclosed--brings together two companies with the shared mission of digitizing, automating, and simplifying the experience of creating entertainment content.

Media Services has been providing payroll and production management solutions to the entertainment industry for more than 40 years. Its software offerings, including digital payroll tools, accounting solutions, and its flagship Showbiz suite of products help content creators streamline a broad range of production processes. The company is based in Los Angeles, with a regional office in New York.

More

  • Thursday, Feb. 13, 2020
Bernard Weiser, president of EIPMA
LOS ANGELES -- 

The Entertainment Industry Professionals Mentoring Alliance (EIPMA), a new, non-profit organization offering mentoring and career guidance to students and young professionals seeking artistic and technical careers in media and entertainment, will mark its official launch at an open house on Saturday, March 7, at Avid Technology in Burbank. Open to educators, students and young professionals, the free event will include speakers, panel discussions and information booths centered on behind-the-scenes careers in cinema, television and music.

A coalition of companies and organizations from across the media and entertainment industry, EIPMA is dedicated to nurturing the industry’s next generation of talent. It plans to partner with high schools, universities and entertainment industry organizations to increase student awareness for career opportunities in the entertainment industry through job fairs, speaker programs, webinars and other events. It More

  • Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2020
In this Friday, Jan. 19, 2007 file photo German movie producer Joseph Vilsmaier attends the awarding ceremony of the Bavarian Movie Award at the Prinzregententheater in Munich, Germany. German filmmaker Joseph Vilsmaier, whose striking portrayal of the Battle of Stalingrad brought home the horrors of war to a new generation, has died. His agent confirmed Wednesday that Vilsmaier 'died peacefully at his home' in Bavaria on Tuesday at the age of 81. (AP Photo/Christof Stache, file)
BERLIN (AP) -- 

Joseph Vilsmaier, a German filmmaker whose striking portrayal of the Battle of Stalingrad brought home the horrors of war to a new generation, has died. He was 81.

His agent confirmed Wednesday that Vilsmaier "died peacefully at his home" in Bavaria on Tuesday.

Vilsmaier's 1993 film "Stalingrad" painted a grim picture of the fate of a group of Wehrmacht soldiers sent to the eastern front in 1942 to fight what would become a losing battle against the Soviet Army. The months-long siege of the city, now known as Volgograd, cost the lives of millions of soldiers and civilians and marked a turning point for Nazi Germany in World War II.

Born in Munich in 1939, Vilsmaier studied music and worked as a technician before gaining a foothold in the film business in the early 1960s as a runner and later making a name for himself as a cameraman for German television.

Vilsmaier made his debut as a film director in 1988 with "Herbstmilch," More

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