Displaying 91 - 100 of 4215
  • Saturday, May. 16, 2020
This Tuesday, July 19, 2016, file photo shows the Google logo at the company's headquarters in Mountain View, Calif. Federal and state regulators in the U.S. are preparing to file antitrust lawsuits alleging Google has abused its dominance of online search and advertising to stifle competition and and boost its profits, according to a report published Friday, May 15, 2020. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (AP) -- 

Federal and state regulators in the U.S. are preparing to file antitrust lawsuits alleging Google has abused its dominance of online search and advertising to stifle competition and and boost its profits, according to a report published Friday.

The Wall Street Journal cited unidentified people familiar with the probes  in a story  about the upcoming offensive by the U.S. Justice Department and the attorneys general from several states.

The Justice Department may file its case as early as this summer while Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton may take action in the fall, along with his peers in other states, according to the Journal.

U.S. Attorney General William Barr has previously said he hoped to decide whether to pursue an antitrust case against Google by the summer. Texas and other states announced they were looking into Google's business practices last September. 

Google acknowledged it has ongoing discussions with the More

  • Friday, May. 15, 2020
This image released by CBS All Access shows, from left, Ethan Peck as Spock, Rebecca Romijn as Number One, and Anson Mount as Captain Pike of the the CBS All Access series "Star Trek: Strange New Worlds." CBS All Access is bringing back Spock for its third full live action show in the “Star Trek” universe, ordering a new series set in the years before Capt. James T. Kirk helmed the U.S.S. Enterprise. (Michael Gibson/CBS via AP)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

CBS All Access is bringing back Spock for its third full live action show in the "Star Trek" universe, ordering a new series set in the years before Capt. James T. Kirk helmed the U.S.S. Enterprise.

"Star Trek: Strange New Worlds" will star Anson Mount as Capt. Christopher Pike, Rebecca Romijn as Number One and Ethan Peck as Science Officer Spock.

It will be the third show in the Alex Kurtzman-pioneered Trekverse after "Star Trek: Discovery" and "Star Trek: Picard." Peck, Mount and Romijn will be reprising their respective roles from Season 2 of "Discovery."

"Fans fell in love with Anson Mount, Rebecca Romijn and Ethan Peck's portrayals of these iconic characters when they were first introduced on 'Star Trek: Discovery' last season," said Julie McNamara, executive vice president and head of programming at CBS All Access. "This new series will be a perfect complement to the franchise, bringing a whole new perspective and series of More

  • Friday, May. 15, 2020
In this July 5, 2019, file photo, Riza Aziz, stepson of Malaysian former Prime Minister Najib Razak, walks into a court room at Kuala Lumpur High Court in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Malaysian prosecutors have dropped money laundering charges against "The Wolf of Wall Street" producer and stepson of former premier Najib Razak, in a move slammed by Human Rights Watch as a "triumph for impunity and corruption." (AP Photo/Vincent Thian, File)
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) -- 

Malaysian prosecutors have dropped money laundering charges against "The Wolf of Wall Street" film producer and stepson of ex-Prime Minister Najib Razak in a move slammed by Human Rights Watch on Friday as a "triumph for impunity and corruption."

Former Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad said he was worried the move could set a precedent in graft cases in which "thieves will be let off if they return the stolen money."

Riza Aziz reached a settlement with the government and was discharged Thursday without being formally acquitted, meaning that prosecutors can revive the charge. The anti-graft agency said in a statement that the government will recover $107.3 million of overseas assets involved in the case — about 43% of the $248 million Aziz was accused of having laundered from the 1MDB state investment fund — and Riza is also required to pay an unspecified fine. 

Riza was the third person in his family to be charged last year over the More

  • Thursday, May. 14, 2020
This image released by The CW shows Jared Padalecki as Sam, left, and Jensen Ackles as Dean in a scene from "Supernatural." The long-running series will end after their 15th season. (Katie Yu/The CW via AP)
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- 

The CW network is pushing the traditional fall start of its new season to January 2021, a response to the industry-wide production shutdown caused by the coronavirus.

Instead of debuting new and returning CW series this fall, the network said Thursday that it plans to air the final episodes of "Supernatural" amid a mix of unscripted and acquired series including "Swamp Thing" from the DC Universe streaming service.

Mark Pedowitz, the network's chairman and CEO, said he anticipated that production could resume by late summer or early fall on the final two episodes of "Supernatural," adding to the five already completed.

"If not, we will then become very flexible and rearrange our schedule," he told a teleconference. 

Other networks also are dealing with fallout from the production halt forced by the pandemic, with some delaying their fall schedule announcements.

The studios making CW's other series have targeted a More

  • Thursday, May. 14, 2020
Using social distancing practices, moviegoers watch a show at the Stars and Stripes Drive-In Theater that reopened in New Braunfels, Texas, Friday, May 1, 2020. Texas' stay-at-home orders due to the new coronavirus pandemic have expired and Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has eased restrictions on many businesses that have now opened, including theaters. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- 

Indie films and drive-in theaters don't usually go together. Drive-ins need the big movies, the ones with superheroes and superstars, to draw substantial audiences. So it was a little surprising when " The Wretched," a supernatural horror flick with no stars, earned nearly $70,000 from 12 drive-in theaters on its first weekend.

In just two weeks, the IFC Films release has made over $200,000 from drive-ins alone, some of which are only open on the weekends for a single showing a night. And it's been available to rent at home the whole time. In pre-pandemic times, it would be considered a solid opening for the IFC. In the current climate, it's a big hit.

The pandemic has forced many in the movie business to get creative with release dates and strategies. For most, that's meant delaying things a few months or more. But IFC Films found a silver lining in the drive-in, a theatrical experience uniquely suited to social distancing that also More

  • Thursday, May. 14, 2020
In this Feb. 25, 2020 photo shows the icon for TikTok taken in New York. Privacy watchdogs say that the popular TikTok video app is violating a children’s privacy law and putting kids at risk. They filed a complaint saying TikTok is collecting personal information of kids under 13 without their parents’ consent, even after a $5.7 million FTC fine in 2019 over child-privacy law violations.(AP Photo)

Privacy watchdogs say that the popular TikTok video app is violating a children's privacy law and putting kids at risk.

A coalition of 20 groups, including Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood and the Center for Digital Democracy, filed a complaint Thursday with the Federal Trade Commission saying that TikTok is collecting personal information of kids under 13 without their parents' consent. 

TikTok, owned by Chinese company ByteDance, has exploded in popularity with young people thanks to its goofy, lighthearted feel and ease of use. 

At the same time, it's drawn scrutiny from U.S. officials concerned about national-security risks due to its Chinese ownership and its popularity with kids. 

TikTok paid a $5.7 million fine  to the FTC in 2019 over collecting personal information from kids under 13, a violation of the federal Children's Online Privacy Protection Act. It revamped its app with a restricted mode for younger More

  • Thursday, May. 14, 2020
SAG-AFTRA headquarters in Los Angeles
LOS ANGELES -- 

Jonathan E. Fielding, MD, MPH, MPA has joined SAG-AFTRA’s team of specialists advising the union in developing and implementing new safety protocols for preventing the spread of COVID-19 when production resumes.

A nationally recognized expert in public health preparedness and communication, Fielding brings decades of public health expertise to the mission of charting a safe path forward for SAG-AFTRA members as the entertainment industry considers reopening. His chief objective will be to work with union leaders to create a set of protocols that establish minimum safety standards and maximize the mitigation of risks associated with traditional modes of production.

SAG-AFTRA president Gabrielle Carteris said, “We are working tirelessly to establish a structure that will allow our members to safely return to work. Dr. Fielding’s expertise is a critical piece in solving the unique challenges our industry presents.” 

SAG-AFTRA national More

  • Tuesday, May. 12, 2020
This June 14, 1998 file photo shows Chicago Bulls' Michael Jordan looking up at the score during the third quarter of their NBA Finals game against the Utah Jazz in Salt Lake City. “The Last Dance,” ESPN’s docuseries detailing the 1998 and final season of the Chicago Bulls championship dynasty, has served as a reminder to basketball fans of the greatness of Michael Jordan on the court. It also shed light on his worldwide marketing allure. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill, File)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

"The Last Dance," ESPN's docuseries detailing the 1998 and final season of the Chicago Bulls championship dynasty, has served as a reminder to basketball fans of the greatness of Michael Jordan on the court. While it's showcased Jordan's dominance between baselines, it's also shed light on his worldwide marketing allure.

Although the Hall-of-Famer starred in many memorable commercials  throughout the 1990s for major brands such McDonald's "Nothing But Net" spot and Nike's "Failure" ad, one of his most famous may be Gatorade's "Be Like Mike" commercial. 

But if it weren't inadvertently for the Walt Disney corporation, the melodic jingle would've never been made.

"My whole goal in advertising, I told my wife right when I got into it, was I just wanted to create a little sliver of pop culture somewhere along the line," said Bernie Pitzel, the advertising executive who created the song. "Everybody knows I've been saying that for years. More

  • Tuesday, May. 12, 2020
This July 9, 2016 file photo shows actor and "Hamilton" creator Lin-Manuel Miranda, center, takes his final performance curtain call at the Richard Rogers Theatre in New York. The Walt Disney Company said Tuesday, May 12, 2020, it will offer the live capture of Miranda’s show on Disney TV Plus starting on July 3. It had been slated to be in movie theaters in October, 2021. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

This July Fourth holiday, you'll be able to see the original Broadway cast of "Hamilton" perform the musical smash about a Founding Father from the comfort of your couch.

The Walt Disney Company said Tuesday it will put the live capture of Lin-Manuel Miranda's show on Disney TV Plus starting on July 3. It had been slated to be in movie theaters in October, 2021.

"I'm so grateful to all the fans who asked for this, and I'm so glad that we're able to make it happen. I'm so proud of this show. I can't wait for you to see it," Miranda said in a statement.

The groundbreaking, biographical hip-hop show about the life of Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton won 11 Tony Awards and made numerous tours.

The film was made at the Richard Rodgers Theatre on Broadway in June of 2016, and stars all of the original Tony Award winners — Miranda as Alexander Hamilton; Daveed Diggs as Marquis de Lafayette/Thomas Jefferson; Renée Elise More

  • Monday, May. 11, 2020
This April 26, 2017, file photo shows the Twitter app icon on a mobile phone in Philadelphia. Twitter announced Monday, May 11, 2020, it will warn users with a label when a tweet contains disputed or misleading information about the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
CHICAGO (AP) -- 

Twitter announced Monday it will start alerting users when a tweet makes disputed or misleading claims about the coronavirus.

The new rule is the latest in a wave of stricter policies that tech companies are rolling out to confront an outbreak of virus-related misinformation on their sites. Facebook and Google, which owns YouTube, have already put similar systems in place.

The announcement signals that Twitter is taking its role in amplifying misinformation more seriously. But how the platform enforces its new policy will be the real test, with company leaders already tamping down expectations. 

Yoel Roth, Twitter's head of site integrity, acknowledged as much: "We will not be able to take enforcement action on every tweet with incomplete or disputed information about COVID-19."

Roth said Monday the platform has historically applied a "lighter touch" when enforcing similar policies on misleading tweets but said the company is More

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