Tuesday, July 16, 2019

News Briefs

Displaying 31 - 40 of 3664
  • Thursday, Jun. 27, 2019
Martin Cohen to receive Motion Picture Editors Guild’s Fellowship and Service Award
Martin Cohen
LOS ANGELES -- 

The Motion Picture Editors Guild (MPEG) will honor veteran postproduction executive and producer Martin Cohen with its prestigious Fellowship and Service Award, recognizing an individual who embodies the values set forth by the Guild: professionalism, collaboration, mentorship, generosity of spirit and commitment to the labor movement.  Cohen will receive the award at a gala in his honor on October 5 at the Sheraton Universal Hotel in Universal City.

One of the most beloved and respected members of the post community, Cohen served as head of postproduction for Amblin Entertainment beginning in 1987 and then for DreamWorks from 1994 to 2005, before moving to Paramount Pictures where he oversaw all aspects of feature postproduction including editorial, sound design, digital intermediates and piracy protection for all the studio’s releases through 2010.  Cohen’s expertise and interest are not limited to editing or postproduction.  He has also served as a producer or executive producer on countless films such films as “The Hunger Games,” “Mothman,” “The Seventh Son” and “Godzilla,” among many others, and directed the pilot for the web series “Action Figures.”  A passionate cinephile, Cohen is a dedicated film preservationist and among his numerous projects and accomplishments, he supervised the restoration of several notable classics including Francis Ford Coppola’s “The Godfather” trilogy and “Jaws.” 

“We are delighted to honor Marty with our Fellowship and Service award,” stated Alan Heim, ACE, president of the Motion Picture Editors Guild. “He perfectly exemplifies the values that the Guild holds most dear by forging a career in this industry that has served not only the films on which he has worked, but the many filmmakers and colleagues with whom he’s collaborated.  He has consistently given back to our community and that makes him the ideal recipient for our highest honor.”

“I am honored and deeply moved that the Editors Guild is bestowing me with this prestigious award. I thank all my brothers and sisters for this honor!” stated Cohen.

The Fellowship and Service Award was established 12 years ago by the Guild’s board of directors.  Previous recipients of this distinguished honor are Dede Allen, ACE; Joseph Aredas; Lillian Benson, ACE; Donn Cambern, ACE; Lee Dichter, CAS; Don Hall; Carol Littleton, ACE; Donald O. Mitchell and Thomas C. Short.

  • Wednesday, Jun. 26, 2019
Zuckerberg says company "evaluating" deepfake video policy
In this May 1, 2018, file photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg makes the keynote speech at F8, Facebook's developer conference, in San Jose, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- 

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg says the company is evaluating how it should handle "deepfake" videos created with artificial intelligence and high-tech tools to yield false but realistic clips.

In an interview at the Aspen Ideas Festival in Colorado on Wednesday, Zuckerberg said it might make sense to treat such videos differently from other misinformation such as false news. Facebook has long held that it should not decide what is and isn't true, leaving such calls instead to outside fact-checkers.

But Zuckerberg says it's worth asking whether deepfakes are a "completely different category" from regular false statements. He says developing a policy on these videos is "really important" as AI technology grows more sophisticated.

Facebook, like other social media companies, does not have a specific policy against deepfakes, whose potential threat has emerged only in the last couple of years. Company executives have said in the past that it makes sense to look at them under the broader umbrella of false or misleading information. But Zuckerberg is signaling that this view might be changing, leaving open the possibility that Facebook might ban deepfakes altogether.

Doing so, of course, could get complicated. Satire, art and political dissent could be swept up in any overly broad ban, creating more headaches from Facebook.

Other false videos could still get a pass. For instance, the recent altered video of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi that made her sound like she was slurring her words does not meet the definition of a deepfake.

  • Wednesday, Jun. 26, 2019
American Film Market to include Immersive Summit
LOS ANGELES -- 

The American Film Market (AFM®) has announced the addition of programming and dedicated exhibition space to spotlight immersive content and technology for the 2019 market.  AFM will celebrate its 40th edition November 6-13 in Santa Monica.

For the AFM’s expansion into Extended Reality (XR), the Immersive Summit presented by entertainment/educational conferences producer Winston Baker will take place on November 9 at the Fairmont Miramar Hotel. The half-day Summit will be a collaborative and educational event for creatives, buyers, sellers and innovators of the XR industry. The program will include keynotes and panel discussions featuring creators, international industry experts and decision makers, to address the stages of bringing immersive content, such as virtual and augmented reality, to market.

Further supporting the burgeoning XR industry, a new XR Space will run alongside the AFM’s marketplace and LocationEXPO. Located in the Loews Santa Monica Beach Hotel over four days, November 9 – 12, creatives, producers and tech leaders will converge in the XR Space to showcase their latest works and technology. The exhibitions will be open to all AFM participants seamlessly connecting the XR industry and experience to filmmakers and the global motion picture industry--over 7,000 participants from 70+ countries.

“The rapid developments in immersive technology are creating opportunities for artists, producers and entrepreneurs,” AFM managing director Jonathan Wolf commented. “The Immersive Summit is a perfect fit for our global participants who seek a glimpse into their future.”

“As the AR/VR industry matures, it’s crucial to provide a platform which supports immersive projects from development to distribution. We are honored and excited to join forces to bring our Immersive Summit series to the American Film Market,” said Katherine Winston and Amy Baker, Co-Founders of Winston Baker, in a joint statement.

Registration for the 2019 American Film Market is now open. Click here for exhibition and registration information.

 

  • Wednesday, Jun. 26, 2019
"The Office" to leave Netflix for NBCUniversal in Jan. 2021
In this April 14, 2009, file photo cast members, from left, Jenna Fischer, Angela Kinsey, Craig Robinson, and Steve Carell are seen after cutting a cake celebrating the 100th episode of the television show "The Office" in Malibu, Calif. (AP Photo/Matt Sayles, File)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

Netflix's announcement that NBC's hit show "The Office" will be pulled from its lineup after 2020 and head to NBCUniversal's upcoming service is the latest example of jockeying between streaming services that is set to heat up as they bulk up their TV and movie offerings to attract users.

In a tweet Tuesday, Netflix said it was "sad" that NBC was taking back the show but added it will still be on Netflix for the next year and a half.

As people abandon traditional pay TV providers like cable, services like Netflix and Hulu have benefited by offering viewers TV shows from traditional networks. But content makers like NBC Universal, Disney and Warner Media are entering the game and will likely take back much of their own shows and movies.

  • Wednesday, Jun. 26, 2019
Sheryl Crow says 2008 fire destroyed all her master tapes
Sheryl Crow on NBC's "Today" show in New York on April 19, 2017. (AP Photo)
LONDON (AP) -- 

Singer Sheryl Crow says the original tapes of albums such as "Tuesday Night Music Club" and the track "All I Wanna Do" perished in a 2008 fire at Universal Music Group.

Crow told the BBC Wednesday that her master tapes and back-ups were destroyed in the blaze and that she only discovered the loss after a New York Times report revealed the extent of the damage.

Crow says the fire "feels a little apocalyptic" and that she didn't "understand the cover-up."

A group of artists, including Soundgarden and estates representing Tupac Shakur and Tom Petty, have sued. The artists allege that Universal failed to protect music ruined in the fire and inform them of the extent of its impact.

Universal did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

  • Wednesday, Jun. 26, 2019
Sebastian Maniscalco to host MTV's 2019 Video Music Awards
In this Aug. 5, 2017 file photo Sebastian Maniscalco arrives at the LA Premiere of "The Nut Job 2: Nutty by Nature" in Los Angeles. (Photo by Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP, File)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

Comedian and actor Sebastian Maniscalco will host MTV's 2019 Video Music Awards.

He'll be joined at the Prudential Center in Newark, New Jersey, on Aug. 26 by some of the industry's biggest stars as they celebrate the year's music videos.

Executive producer Bruce Gillmer says Maniscalco's "comedic spin on relatable topics will make this year's show truly unforgettable."

Maniscalco is currently on his North American "You Bother Me" tour.

The 45-year-old was the 2018 Billboard "Comedian of the Year" and made his feature film debut last year in the Oscar-winning "Green Book."

He'll next be seen on Netflix in Martin Scorsese's "The Irishman," with Robert De Niro, Al Pacino and Joe Pesci.

  • Tuesday, Jun. 25, 2019
What's your data worth to Big Tech? Bill would compel answer
In this April 18, 2017 file photo, conference workers speak in front of a demo booth at Facebook's annual F8 developer conference, in San Jose, Calif. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)
WASHINGTON (AP) -- 

As Congress bears down on big tech companies, two senators want to force giants like Google, Facebook and Amazon to tell users what data they're collecting from them and how much it's worth.

The legislation floated Monday by Sens. Mark Warner, D-Va., and Josh Hawley, R-Mo., goes to the heart of the tech giants' lucrative business model: harvesting data from platform users and making it available to advertisers so they can pinpoint specific consumers to target.

"When a big tech company says its product is free, consumers are the ones being sold," Hawley said in a statement. "These 'free' products track everything we do so tech companies can sell our information to the highest bidder and use it to target us with creepy ads. Even worse, tech companies do their best to hide how much consumer data is worth and to whom it is sold."

The measure would require commercial services with more than 100 million active monthly users to disclose to their customers and financial regulators the types of data they collect. They also would have to provide their users with an assessment at frequent intervals of the data's value to them.

It comes as bipartisan support grows in Congress for a privacy law that could sharply rein in the ability of the biggest tech companies to collect and make money from users' personal data. At the same time, a House panel has opened a bipartisan investigation of Silicon Valley's market dominance.

The Internet Association, the tech industry's major trade group representing Facebook, Google and dozens of other tech companies including Netflix and Airbnb, said Monday that it supports a comprehensive data privacy law.

"Data helps businesses, across all industries and of all sizes and business models, provide consumers with better products and services," the group's president and CEO Michael Beckerman said in a statement. "The internet industry supports a comprehensive, economy-wide federal privacy law that covers all companies ... to give consumers the protections and rights they need to take full control of the data they provide to companies."

The group's statement didn't directly address the issue of mandating companies to put a value on users' data.

Unlike many industrialized nations, the U.S. has no overarching national law governing data collection and privacy. Instead, it has a patchwork of federal laws that protect specific types of data, such as consumer health and financial information, and the personal data generated by younger children. A national law would be the first of its kind in the U.S. and could allow people to see or prohibit the use of their data. Companies could be required to seek permission to provide the data to third parties. A law could shrink Big Tech's crucial revenues from advertising.

There's no parallel legislation in the House for the new Senate bill, called the Dashboard Act, and its prospects are unclear.

Warner, who amassed a fortune as a tech industry investor and executive before entering politics, and Hawley, a freshman and conservative who pursued investigations of Google and Facebook's business practices as Missouri attorney general, have been especially active in the debate over big tech.

  • Tuesday, Jun. 25, 2019
One Twenty Nine Films expands to NYC; Mulligan named EP
Robert Mulligan
SAN FRANCISCO -- 

One Twenty Nine Films is expanding to the East Coast and widening its scope beyond its niche in advertising production into original content. The company has hired veteran producer Robert Mulligan to serve as its executive producer in New York City. Previously director of content at Momentum Worldwide, Mulligan will oversee production activity in New York and work to develop new business in commercials, branded content and digital media. He will also team with One Twenty Nine Films founder Nick Seuser to further the company’s plans to develop television, feature and documentary content.

After a successful track record on the West Coast, One Twenty Nine Films is aiming to establish a national presence while also tapping into a diversifying advertising market and booming demand for original content. “We have great relationships with agencies in San Francisco and the West, as well as tech companies and other brands based here, but we want to broaden our reach,” said Seuser who added that the company seeks to create new opportunities for its roster of directors by forging relationships with agencies in New York and elsewhere, and by moving into original content.

One Twenty Nine Films’ roster includes directors Adrian Rojas Elliot, Daniel Mabe, David Rosenbaum, Ian Schiller, Mary Dauterman, Max Gutierrez, Nicholas Weigel, Patrick Biesemans, Rosie Haber and Tony Benna. Their recent work includes projects for Netflix, Specialized, Head, Google, Nike, and Alfa Romeo.

Mulligan has more than 20 years of experience as an agency and production company producer. “He’s a strong EP with a great rep and established industry relationships in New York City,” Seuser observed. “He has the wherewithal and the expertise we need. He’s comfortable in both the agency and production worlds. He has hands-on experience in every type of production.”

At Momentum Worldwide, Mulligan produced commercials, branded content, and virtual reality for clients, including American Express, SAP, Verizon, Facebook and Amazon, winning multiple awards, including Gold Clios for his work for American Express. After receiving his Master of Fine Arts, from the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in London, Mulligan independently financed “BOXED’” a feature film he wrote, produced, and directed. “BOXED” received multiple awards from domestic and international film festivals, thus opening the door to NYC’s vibrant filmmaking community and tapping Mulligan to write and produce Jane’s Addiction’s documentary, “Enit Festival.” He went on to spend the next six years producing award-winning music videos and commercials before joining F.A.Q. Productions/Partizan Films, New York as executive producer.

Mulligan has helped One Twenty Nine Films, New York, get off to a fast start. The company is in pre-production for an advertising campaign for a major bank, and kicking off branded work for two prominent San Francisco-based tech companies. It is also in talks with a major streaming distributor to create original content. 

  • Monday, Jun. 24, 2019
Senior Facebook executive says it would favor regulation
This March 28, 2018, file photo shows a Facebook logo at the company's headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. Facebook’s plan to create a digital currency used across the world is already raising concern with financial regulators and privacy experts. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
LONDON -- 

A senior Facebook executive says the social media site is in favor of regulation to address some of the dark problems of the internet.

Nick Clegg, the former leader of the U.K. Liberal Democrat party who now heads global affairs for Facebook, says it is not "for private companies" to decide how to balance free speech versus public harm.

Clegg told the BBC on Monday that companies like Facebook are not "shunning" government intervention but advocating a "sensible way" forward in addressing issues such as cyberbullying or fake news.

Lawmakers have been pushing tech companies to take down offensive content more quickly and to do more in general to halt internet harm. But Clegg says it is up to "democratic politicians in the democratic world" to set the rules.

  • Friday, Jun. 21, 2019
WTVR, Groupe TVA, YES Network among big winners at Promax Station Summit Awards
Marshall Hites, recipient of the Promax Lifetime Achievement Award
LAS VEGAS -- 

Television stations from Dallas/Fort Worth, Montréal, New York City and Richmond, Va., were some of the big winners at the 2019 Promax Awards at Station Summit, the annual celebration of the best marketing and promotion in the broadcasting industry. The award presentation took place on Thursday (6/20) at the annual Promax Station Summit at The Mirage in Las Vegas.

WTVR Richmond, Va.; Montréal-based Groupe TVA; Dallas/Ft. Worth-based KXAS Brand Marketing; and New York-based YES Network led the winners’ list this year.

Other stations taking home multiple awards included KADN Lafayette, La.; WGN Chicago; WCIU Chicago; KTVT Dallas; KVVU Las Vegas; and WWBT Richmond, Va. The full list of winners can be found here.

Kevin Frazier, co-anchor for Entertainment Tonight, presided over the luncheon ceremony at The Mirage in Las Vegas.

The awards are presented by Promax, the global trade association for the media marketing profession. The awards honor outstanding achievement in local broadcast marketing — the campaigns that build loyal viewership and create the local television brands that are vital partners in community life in cities and towns across North America.

Gold and Silver awards are handed out in categories honoring everything from the best weather programming spot to the funniest promo. Each year, work is entered by individual stations, network in-house creative groups, or station groups and their parent companies.

Also Marshall Hites, Tribune Broadcasting’s senior vice president, marketing and creative services, was awarded the 2019 Promax Lifetime Achievement Award. This award is the association’s highest honor, bestowed by the Board of Directors in recognition of outstanding achievement over the course of a career dedicated to celebrating excellence, driving talent, and connecting people.

Hites is an award-winning broadcast marketing executive with over 50 years in local television. He oversees brand management, advertising, on-air promotion, graphics, and design areas for Tribune Media’s 42 broadcast stations. Each of the individual station creative directors work directly with Hites on these and other matters related to the station’s branding, competitive positioning, and creative endeavors.

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