Displaying 21 - 30 of 5095
  • Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2021
In this April 29, 2016, file photo, Mary Cain walks off the track after competing in the women's special 1500-meter run at the Drake Relays athletics meet in Des Moines, Iowa. Distance runner Mary Cain, whose career fizzled after what she has called four miserable years at the Nike Oregon Project, has filed a $20 million lawsuit against her former coach, Alberto Salazar, and their employer, Nike, Monday, Oct. 11, 2021. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File)
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) -- 

Distance runner Mary Cain, whose career fizzled after what she has called four miserable years at the Nike Oregon Project, has filed a $20 million lawsuit against her former coach, Alberto Salazar, and their employer, Nike.

Cain accused Salazar of emotionally abusing her when she joined the team in 2012 at age 16, The Oregonian/OregonLive reported. The lawsuit portrays Salazar as an angry control freak who was obsessed with Cain's weight and publicly humiliated her about it.

That, she said, took a toll on her physical and mental health. Nike was aware but failed to intervene, according to the lawsuit.

Nike did not return messages from the newspaper seeking comment. Salazar could not be reached but has previously denied abuse allegations, and has said neither Cain nor her parents raised concerns while she was part of the program.

In the lawsuit filed Monday in Multnomah County Circuit Court, Cain alleges Salazar on several More

  • Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2021
Mark Harmon appears in a scene from “NCIS.” (Michael Yarish/CBS)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

The lead character of television's most popular drama exited the show Monday without a fuss, and without the immediate ratings bump that would be expected if there had been.

"NCIS" star Mark Harmon, who has played Special Agent Leroy Jethro Gibbs since the CBS drama began in 2003, had his final night as a regular character on Monday's show. Gibbs informed his partner after working on a case in Alaska that he was going to stay there.

At Harmon's request, CBS made no special promotion of the occasion, a muted departure for an industry that has never been shy about hawking the movements of big stars.

That may partly be because Harmon, 70, hasn't ruled out the possibility of an occasional return.

"Our north star has always been staying true to our characters, and that truth has always guided the stories we tell and where those characters go," said Steve Binder, "NCIS" executive producer, in a statement. "So regarding the future More

  • Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2021
In this Tuesday, May 20, 2008, file photo, Brian Goldner, of Hasbro, stands next to some of the company's toy figures at Hasbro's headquarters, in Pawtucket, R.I. Toy and entertainment company Hasbro has announced that its CEO and chairman Brian D. Goldner has died at age 58. The announcement Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2021, comes two days after the company said Goldner was taking a medical leave of absence from his CEO role, effective immediately. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

Brian Goldner, who as CEO and chairman spearheaded Hasbro's transformation from a toy company to an entertainment force, has died. He was 58.

The announcement Tuesday came two days after the Pawtucket, Rhode Island, company said Goldner was taking a medical leave of absence. 

Hasbro did not give a cause of death, but Goldner disclosed in August 2020 that he had been undergoing treatment for cancer since 2014. 

Goldner, who joined Hasbro in 2000, served as the CEO of Hasbro Inc. since 2008, and as chairman since May 2015. 

Under his stewardship, Hasbro expanded beyond toys and games into television, movies, digital gaming and other areas. That strategy culminated with the 2019 acquisition Entertainment One Ltd., a British entertainment company that produces "Peppa Pig," "PJ Masks" and other animated shows for preschoolers.

Goldner also served on the board of ViacomCBS.

Marc Rosenberg, a toy consultant who closely More

  • Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2021
In this Jan. 29, 2016 file photo, Andy Parker and his wife, Barbara, listen as Virginia Gov. Terry McAulliffe announces a compromise on a set of gun bills at the Capitol in Richmond, Va. The family of a slain journalist is asking the Federal Trade Commission, Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2021, to take action against Facebook for failing to remove online footage of her shooting death. Andy Parker says the company is violating its own terms of service in hosting videos on Facebook and its sibling service Instagram that glorify violence. His daughter, TV news reporter Alison Parker, and cameraman Adam Ward were killed by a former co-worker while reporting for Roanoke, Virginia’s WDBJ-TV in August 2015. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
WASHINGTON (AP) -- 

The family of a slain journalist is asking the Federal Trade Commission to take action against Facebook for failing to remove online footage of her shooting death.

Andy Parker said Tuesday the company is violating its own terms of service in hosting videos on Facebook and its sibling service Instagram that glorify violence.

His daughter, TV news reporter Alison Parker, and cameraman Adam Ward were killed by a former co-worker while reporting for Roanoke, Virginia's WDBJ-TV in August 2015. Video footage of the shooting — some of which was taken by the gunman — repeatedly resurfaces on Facebook and Instagram despite assurances from top executives that it will be removed, says a complaint filed Tuesday by Parker and attorneys with the Georgetown Law Civil Rights Clinic.

"The reality is that Facebook and Instagram put the onus on victims and their families to do the policing of graphic content — requiring them to relive their worst More

  • Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2021
Dave Chappelle arrives at the 22nd Annual Mark Twain Prize for American Humor on Oct. 27, 2019, in Washington, D.C. A top Netflix executive said Dave Chappelle's special “The Closer” doesn't cross “the line on hate” and will remain on the streaming service despite fallout over the comedian's remarks about the trans community. (Photo by Owen Sweeney/Invision/AP, File)
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- 

A top Netflix executive said Dave Chappelle's special "The Closer" doesn't cross "the line on hate" and will remain on the streaming service despite fallout over the comedian's remarks about the transgender community.

In an internal memo, co-CEO Ted Sarandos told managers that "some talent" may join third parties in calling for the show's removal, adding, "which we are not going to do."

Netflix declined comment on the memo, which was reported Monday by Variety.

But the company responded to news reports it had suspended three employees, including one, Terra Field, who'd criticized Chappelle's special in tweets. Field identifies herself on Twitter as a senior software engineer at Netflix and as trans.

"It is absolutely untrue to say that we have suspended any employees for tweeting about this show. Our employees are encouraged to disagree openly and we support their right to do so," Netflix said in a statement.

According More

  • Sunday, Oct. 10, 2021
In this June 4, 2012, file photo, an unidentified 11-year-old girl logs into Facebook on her iPhone at her home in Palo Alto, Calif. Facebook, in the aftermath of damning testimony that its platforms harm children, will be introducing several features including prompting teens to take a break using its photo sharing app Instagram, and “nudging" teens if they are repeatedly looking at the same content that's not conducive to their well-being. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

Facebook, in the aftermath of damning testimony that its platforms harm children, will be introducing several features including prompting teens to take a break using its photo sharing app Instagram, and "nudging" teens if they are repeatedly looking at the same content that's not conducive to their well-being. 

The Menlo Park, California-based Facebook is also planning to introduce new controls for adults of teens on an optional basis so that parents or guardians can supervise what their teens are doing online. These initiatives come after Facebook announced late last month that it was pausing work on its Instagram for Kids project. But critics say the plan lacks details and they are skeptical that the new features would be effective. 

The new controls were outlined on Sunday by Nick Clegg, Facebook's vice president for global affairs, who made the rounds on various Sunday news shows including CNN's "State of the Union" and ABC's "This More

  • Friday, Oct. 8, 2021
In this Sept. 24, 2019, file photo, a woman walks below a Google sign on the campus in Mountain View, Calif. Google on Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021, will no longer allow digital ads promoting false climate change claims to appear next to the content of other publishers, hoping to deny money to those making such claims and to stop the spread of misinformation on its platform. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
LONDON (AP) -- 

Google is cracking down on digital ads promoting false climate change claims or being used to make money from such content, hoping to limit revenue for climate change deniers and stop the spread of misinformation on its platforms. 

The company said Thursday in a blog post that the new policy will also apply to YouTube, which last week announced a sweeping crackdown of vaccine misinformation. 

"We've heard directly from a growing number of our advertising and publisher partners who have expressed concerns about ads that run alongside or promote inaccurate claims about climate change," Google said. "Advertisers simply don't want their ads to appear next to this content. 

Publishers and creators on YouTube "don't want ads promoting these claims to appear on their pages or videos," according to Google. 

The restrictions "will prohibit ads for, and monetization of, content that contradicts well-established scientific consensus More

  • Friday, Oct. 8, 2021
Mystery writer Sue Grafton poses for a portrait on Oct. 15, 2002, in New York. A TV adaptation of the late writer's million-selling Kinsey Millhone mystery novels, a prospect the author once swore she would return from the dead to prevent, is now in the works. A+E Studios announced this week that it had acquired rights to Grafton's famed alphabet series, with such titles as "'A' Is for Alibi" and "'E' Is for Evidence." (AP Photo/Gino Domenico, File)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

A TV adaptation of the late Sue Grafton's million-selling Kinsey Millhone mystery novels, a prospect the author once swore she would return from the dead to prevent, is now in the works.

A+E Studios announced this week that it had acquired rights to Grafton's alphabet series, with such titles as "A Is for Alibi" and "E Is for Evidence." Grafton completed 25 Millhone books, through "Y Is for Yesterday," but died in 2017 before she could write a story for Z.

"Sue Grafton is the ultimate storyteller who spent decades entertaining readers through her rich characters and spellbinding mysteries," Barry Jossen, president and head of A+E Studios, said in a statement. "We are honored to carry on her legacy and bring these timeless stories to life. We are actively speaking with interested platforms and seeking a showrunner for the series, as well as the perfect actress to embody the coveted lead role of Kinsey Millhone."

Grafton's many fans More

  • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021
Mary Myles
ORLANDO, Fla. -- 

The ANA has revealed the 2021 recipients of its Rising Marketing Star Awards. The four honorees, all age 30 or under, were nominated by senior executives at their companies for having met the following criteria: Made valuable contributions to the overall excellence/effectiveness of their marketing organization; demonstrated leadership, innovation, creativity, and accountability in executing their marketing responsibilities; exemplified skill in integrating marketing disciplines and working with other professionals; and exhibited knowledge of current issues in advertising and familiarity with the tools marketers are using to reach their audiences.
 
This year’s award recipients are:

  • Georgie Manera, associate brand manager, Listerine Professional, Johnson & Johnson Consumer. Manera has six years of professional experience in marketing and sales across the project management, financial services, and consumer goods industries. Her More
  • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021
This Monday, May 3, 2021 file photo shows the headquarters of Meredith Corp. in Des Moines, Iowa. On Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021, Barry Diller's IAC announced it is buying Meredith, one of the country's largest magazine companies, in hopes of accelerating a digital shift as print fades. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
NEW YORK (AP) -- 

Barry Diller's IAC is buying Meredith, one of the country's largest magazine companies and the publisher of People, Southern Living and InStyle, in hopes of accelerating a digital shift as print fades.

IAC's Dotdash, a collection of websites including Investopedia, Brides, Serious Eats and Simply Recipes, will join with Meredith, the companies announced Wednesday. Dotdash's CEO Neil Vogel will lead the group, which the companies say will reach more than 175 million people online. The deal is expected to close by year's end. IAC is paying $42.18 per share, funded by cash and debt, or about $2.1 billion. IAC values Meredith at $2.7 billion including debt.

It's a big turnaround for Des Moines, Iowa-based Meredith, which only four years ago bought the Time Inc. magazines  for $1.8 billion to bulk up its own magazine business. It proceeded to sell off storied titles that didn't fit in with its lifestyle-based company, like Time, Sports More

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